Author Topic: vintage wiring harness  (Read 10360 times)

Offline Diana Alan

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2013, 06:20:43 PM »
Hi Richard

Great work thanks fo doing it for us.

Diana
REMLR 240.
Perentie FFR 50-422, SIII FFR 30-146, SIIA GunBuggy 112-726, Mk3 Inter 170-437, ex-SADF SIIB/SIII Radio Relay,
Army Trailers: No5 x 2, W/S x 2, PT1-1.2, Horndraulic ATR dog trailer.
Civilian: MY85 RRc HiLine 4.6, MY51 ex-RACQ 80", MY91 Defender/Reynolds Boughton 6x6, MY12 D4 SDV6

Offline Phoenix

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2013, 09:39:27 AM »
I only passed on the information, it was recent conversations about it here that prompted the communication I think.  But invaluable information none the less.  Wonder what an ambualnce loom would cost me .....
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Eden - 1961 Series 2 Ambulance, 108-098

Offline South65pac

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2013, 12:35:31 PM »
Diana

I purchased a Vinwire Harness for my 2A last year with some specific options including three pin pigtails for the head lights and wired for alternator. All came beautifully packaged and I am in the process of fitting it now. I will keep you posted.

Wade and everyone,
The Vinwire loom has some small idiosyncrasies which are not quite correct for a Series IIA Military Land Rover.
Having fitted one to 112-464 I gained good insight into the process of a non technical method of installation via their (Vinwire's) instructions.  I am used to a circuit diagram and rigging it all up - my trade. So doing it by numbers was a little unique and a lot of blind faith which I would later check for continuity. ;D

Oh and be careful with pulling the harness through the bulkhead as it is easily damaged.  My advice is sit the harness in the hot sun, and then whilst it is hot manipulate it in through the bulkhead. If you don't, it is easily damaged. Th ewires are much more supple when warm.

Notes:
1. The Black out switch wires are a little short, and the horn wire was a bit of a challenge to get it to meet the actual horn feed wire....
2. The wire feed for the second wiper motor is non-existant (As the harness is based on a later single wiper motor type SIIA)
3. The Fuel Tank wire is missing for the second fuel tank, along with the banana plug at the dash end which goes to the LH-RH TANK switch on the map light plate.
4. The wire which feeds to the Map light is not long enough or not there (I fitted my loom getting close to three years ago and I cant remember)
5. The trailer wiring harness is not included (so you will have to fabricate one of your own) AND you will need the Yellow plastic terminal board which is always conveniently rusted up!
5A. There was no feed for the diff light either as I recall and NO wire running to the rear for the BLACK OUT lighting to the diff light. - in saying that maybe you just wire it into the tail light circuit. ??? Too long ago from my memory now...
5B. There are no earth tags/terminal junctions for the rear cross member (earths) so you will have to try and save the old ones or procure new ones. That was a PITA for me as I didn't have any spares.. Maybe they are available from Land Rover new??? but I ended up using old ones.
6. There was no 'jumper' to carry power to all the dash lights so I had to make a new one. (the three terminaled circus wire)
7. The ignition/light switch part of the harness has the wrong type of terminals and the wires were very tight.  I had to make up small jumpers for all the terminals. I recommoend you do this as the wiring is attrociously crowded there and it is better to have a bit of give than rip a terminal off.
8. The wiring to the fuse box needs to be CHECKED as I somehow recall it was ar$e about and not as per the Series IIA Army spec wiring diagram.
9. There are countless banana plugs you will need to recycle (or get new ones) as they are not included in the harness.
10. The choke warning wiring had an issue....What it was I can't remember.... :(
11. The rear lighting wires were very short indeedy :-\ and I made some wire jumpers up to reach my lights and indicators. The harness JUST makes the original route with about 5mm to spare.
11. NO GROMMETS are included either so buy up before you fit the loom/harness.

A good tip to test the lights is do it in a dark garage. It is easier to do it than during the day outside.   
All in all, not a bad harness but I still had to jig it a bit to make it work.

I HIGHLY ADVISE YOU CONTINUITY CHECK EVERY SINGLE CIRCUIT BEFORE YOU APPLY POWER. You can use a little AA battery to confirm that the wiring is correct, rather than 12V car battery which will fry the wires if you have made an error in judgement. I personally prefer a beeping type multimeter.  They are all of $20 from Dick Smith's. SO buying one now would be a good investment.

In saying all that, I also opted for a Lucas Alternator (which is common in HQ Holdens) and has a regulator on the back of its housing. It is a great substitute for a generator as you only require two wires to feed to it.

One is the battery power lead, and the other the 'sensing' wire.  I used the LH indicator light as my ALT light on the dash on the sensing wire. :) That way it looks original but the function is that of the alternator 'idiot light'.

The original Lucas voltage regulator is wired as per original but the (separate) generator loom is not connected or used.  Unless you stick your head in teh engine bay to look at the generator you will not know it has an alternator fitted.

Ahh and one MORE thing... I did not run my loom through the chassis as I noticed that where it entered the front hole the harness had corrosion and damage to the wiring at that point so I opted to run it along the top of the chassis. (Take note Pete!)

If you need to run it through make sure you run a thin rope through the chassis so you can pull the loom through.  An easy way to put the rope through if you have already pulled the old loom out and not bothered to tie a feeder rope to it, is to get about 6 old wire coat hangers. Straighten them and then join them all together, then feed them through one hole to the other (with the grommets out) then you simply hook the end of the coat hanger wire with a bit of string or a rod with a J part at one end and pull the end of the first coat hanger out. Tie a length of curtain rope or parachute cord or cheapy clothesline rope to the hanger wire and pull it back through the chassis. When you need to get teh new loom in you simply tie the new loom to the rope end wrap some insulation tape OVER THE END TERMINALS SO THEY ARE NOT DAMAGED BY PULLING THROUGH THE CHASSIS and carefully pull it through the chassis giving it a fresh coat of oil and gunk inside :). But it works.

Someone else here wants their  ::) loom running through the chassis so I used the method above to get a rope through the chassis.

Hope this helps.

Ian
Many and various pieces of tin with wheels.

Offline Diana Alan

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2013, 02:26:41 PM »
Ian

Did you let Vinwire know about the short lengths? 

Without this sort of feedback they can not rectify the problem, remember some of the specs were done several Vinwire owners ago and may have been made with remnants of a damaged harness.

Diana

BTW was gong to contact you as i've been on the farm for the last 2 weeks.
REMLR 240.
Perentie FFR 50-422, SIII FFR 30-146, SIIA GunBuggy 112-726, Mk3 Inter 170-437, ex-SADF SIIB/SIII Radio Relay,
Army Trailers: No5 x 2, W/S x 2, PT1-1.2, Horndraulic ATR dog trailer.
Civilian: MY85 RRc HiLine 4.6, MY51 ex-RACQ 80", MY91 Defender/Reynolds Boughton 6x6, MY12 D4 SDV6

Offline South65pac

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2013, 04:35:02 PM »
Ian

Did you let Vinwire know about the short lengths? 

Without this sort of feedback they can not rectify the problem, remember some of the specs were done several Vinwire owners ago and may have been made with remnants of a damaged harness.

Diana

BTW was gong to contact you as i've been on the farm for the last 2 weeks.

No I have not spoken to him - Vinwire - as I will order the next loom for 112-459 and request changes accordingly that is a few years away yet as there is a CMP and a GPW which will have my attention first. 

I put my old loom in to be repaired at Vinwire and waited a long 8 months. Not in any hurry until towards the end, I called but was told that the original was too far gone. (I won't go there on what I thought as its history). I was offered a new harness. In reality I think that the technical knowledge to repair a loom has been lost. 

In my own field, some years back, I did a replacement to a main loom on a Sea King Helicopter and used 22,000 metres of wire. A huge job but we did it.  I would have liked to had my old harness repaired but.....  :-X All the wires in an aircraft are white, as they are made of very high quality material. each wire is numbered only and colour coding is not used.  Automotive wiring is of a standard to work and that is about it. I still pilfer Japanese made looms for wire as it is usually very good quality (YAKAZI or YAKAZU from memory) ;D

Diana feel free to PM me.

Ian
Many and various pieces of tin with wheels.

Offline rednjoey

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2013, 11:46:06 PM »
Ian

Thankyou for that information, I will be re reading it before I attempt my harness. That isn't far away either. I'm hoping you have saved me some headaches and a few fried wires.
Wade Adams
1967 2A 109 GS 114-349
"Laugh...I thought my boots would never dry"

Offline bizzen

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2013, 04:11:57 PM »
A lot of good tips there from Ian. I 100% completely agree with the multimeter suggestion too.

I've just finished re-wiring from headlight to tail-light a S2a SWB. It took me approximately 6 weekends worth of work to complete but was well worth the effort.

As I was running completely new wiring to everything, including an alternator instead of generator, I simply made the loom to suit everything in the vehicle which also allowed me to run bigger gauge wiring where I thought appropriate.

I even went the extra distance and have fused the main battery power wire with a self resetting 50AMP circuit breaker. All wires to the power drawing devices (headlights, horn, brakes, tail, etc) then go from here to a 10 point blade fuse holder to ensure that those unwanted sparks/shorts if/when they occur, are stopped before potentially destroying the vehicle.

Just follow the info given in the EMEI's available to wire up the blackout light switch and nato plug wiring and you can't go wrong.

Cost a whole lot less than buying a factory/reproduction loom too. I estimate it cost me approx $200-250 all up.

Ben
« Last Edit: April 12, 2013, 04:14:53 PM by bizzen »

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2013, 04:24:07 PM »
Hi Ben & thanks for the info. Welcome to REMLR !

Pete

Offline Diana Alan

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #23 on: April 12, 2013, 04:45:37 PM »
A lot of good tips there from Ian. I 100% completely agree with the multimeter suggestion too.

I've just finished re-wiring from headlight to tail-light a S2a SWB. It took me approximately 6 weekends worth of work to complete but was well worth the effort.

As I was running completely new wiring to everything, including an alternator instead of generator, I simply made the loom to suit everything in the vehicle which also allowed me to run bigger gauge wiring where I thought appropriate.

<snip>
Cost a whole lot less than buying a factory/reproduction loom too. I estimate it cost me approx $200-250 all up.

Ben
Hi Ben

Where did you get the correct colour coded wires?

I had thought of importing a few rolls from the UK, but there must be local suppliers.

Diana
REMLR 240.
Perentie FFR 50-422, SIII FFR 30-146, SIIA GunBuggy 112-726, Mk3 Inter 170-437, ex-SADF SIIB/SIII Radio Relay,
Army Trailers: No5 x 2, W/S x 2, PT1-1.2, Horndraulic ATR dog trailer.
Civilian: MY85 RRc HiLine 4.6, MY51 ex-RACQ 80", MY91 Defender/Reynolds Boughton 6x6, MY12 D4 SDV6

Offline Hot Rover

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #24 on: April 15, 2013, 08:14:51 AM »
One problem that I found with my vinwire harness is the wire numbers are little stickers and the fall off. The solution is to obtain some light coloured heat shrink and write the numbers on with a permanent marker and then shrink it on to the wire with a heat gun.
Cheers
Rod
108-545 1963 Series 2A FFW
51-441 1991 Perentie GS (RamRod)
Series 2 Safari (Matchbox)
173-621 1/2 Ton Trailer, Aust No5

Offline bizzen

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2013, 01:39:24 PM »
Hi Diana,

To answer your question, I didn't use any colour coded wires as per the original loom.

I have instead used brand new wiring/cables from Narva and have simply cable tagged the ends of the wires as they reach each switch, device, etc drawing power.

Still followed the wiring diagram as per the workshop manual so any auto elec or electronic savvy person should be able to follow the wiring (as you only have to read the tag and the other end is at the fuse box) but this is also where the multimeter with continuity buzzer will come in handy should I ever lose a tag off a wire.

Regards,

Ben
« Last Edit: April 15, 2013, 01:41:07 PM by bizzen »

Offline South65pac

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Re: vintage wiring harness
« Reply #26 on: April 19, 2013, 05:59:27 PM »
One problem that I found with my vinwire harness is the wire numbers are little stickers and the fall off. The solution is to obtain some light coloured heat shrink and write the numbers on with a permanent marker and then shrink it on to the wire with a heat gun.
Cheers
Rod

Rod,

Use this link to decipher Lucas wiring http://www.dimebank.com/LucasColours.html Its brilliant. No need to know numbers, its colour coded for simplicity.

Ian
Many and various pieces of tin with wheels.