Author Topic: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck  (Read 143958 times)

Offline GGG

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2016, 07:54:07 PM »
Greg, don't you hate it when something like that happens? I think that we have all done that sort of thing and wished that we could reverse the video. I am pretty conservative with such things being a mere electrician but if it was mine I would cut my losses and look for another drum and not take a chance with it. It may now have cracks that you cannot see which could lead to problems further down the track. There may be better qualified people reading this who may disagree but I prefer to play it safe. Don't give up as you are doing a great job with both trucks. Your photos bring back a lot of good memories for me.
Geoff O.

Offline dkg001

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2016, 08:01:57 AM »
Swap it over with one of the Mk3, it won't be hard to find a replacement drum, I have a spare one you can have, if you can work out a way to get it delivered.

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2016, 10:07:35 AM »
I agree - replace the drum. It is important to remember that the brakes are a safety system, so every single part of the system needs to be in top order.

Don't feel too bad about breaking it; I have done exactly the same thing on an old car I have, when I was teaching myself to service cars.  :-[

If you tap the drum face between the studs with a hammer, there is less risk of breaking the drum and greater chance of breaking the rust bond.

Make sure you use a double-flare when you do the brake pipes - it is a very rewarding feeling when the new pipes go on. Can you not use the old flare nuts? I usually do, unless the hexagon has been damaged,

Cheers Charlie
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Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2016, 06:43:48 PM »
Thanks for that.
I'll switch it for one off the MK3 for now so it doesn't hold things up. That might be fun to get off.
If anyone ever comes down to Tassy, I've had enough truck bits offered to me so far that they would need a big trailer. Or an F2! I don't have one of those yet. The landlord may not like that though. 2 in the back yard might be the limit.  ;D

I got back from up at mum's place, where it's been raining all day, to find that it was fine here and the Ironize has cured nice and hard, but that it was now too dark, damp and cold to prime it. Oh well, the boss just left for a 3 week overseas holiday and left everything for me to handle, so it might be a short day tomorrow.

I pulled the pressure gauge and the pipe out of the dash as someone had bundled all the dash wires up and cable-tied them to the air pipe. Then they rewired the indicators, which now don't work, but in doing so, they bent the pipe and it put pressure on the fitting in the gauge, pushing the dial out of place. The needle won't go below 200 kPa. I'll have a go at fixing the gauge, but I'm replacing the steel air pipe with flex hose. This way it shouldn't happen again.

Greg.

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2016, 09:04:45 PM »
I got the first brake drum primed and painted during the week. It came up looking really good.



Lets hope the rest turn out as good.
When I put it back on, I put a light coat of nickel-seize on the face of the hub where the drum seats and a thin smear around the lip of the drum. Hopefully it will be easier to get off next time.
I put the tire back on, with more nickel-seize on the stud threads and lowered it down. And the damn tire was flat.
I don't know when it happened. I'm pretty sure I would have noticed if it was flat before I took it off. I'll pump it up tomorrow and check the valve.
It's on one of the galvanised rims and the paint is flaking off in large plates, so if I have to pull it off, I'll give it a clean up and paint as well. While the tread depth is still really good, there is a weird patch on the outer sidewall, almost like a melted area about the size of your hand. It feels a lot softer than the rest of the sidewall. To be safe, I will put one of the spare tires on.
I have changed one of these before, but it was over 20 years ago and I don't really remember what I did. Luckily, one of my contractors lined up his on-site tire guy and he is going to show me how to do it.

Seeing as it was flat, I jacked it back up and put a stand under it. Then jacked the opposite side wheel up.
The wheel came off easily and I gave everything a bit of a clean with the wire brush, as there was a lot of flaking paint. On the back, while backing out the brake adjuster, I noticed it had been leaking diff oil. I can't tell if it was leaking past the hub seal or out between the hub and the diff flange, as the caked oil & dirt covered one of the flange nuts. While I was there, I unscrewed the breather valves off both diffs. Nothing happened with the rear one, with the oil leaks, but the one on the intermediate axle actually hissed and popped the valve out when I unscrewed it the last few turns. Definitely some pressure there and it was only around 12 degrees today.
With the wheel off and the adjuster backed out, I started belting the back of the rim with the 4lb hammer and block of hardwood. I had earlier sprayed all of the stud holes and the hub lip with CRC and I think this helped. It only took about 15 minutes of flogging before the drum let go this time.
Looking inside, it showed a large area where the oil and brake dust had stuck to the drum.

I figured I may as well take one of the drums off the MK3 while I had all the gear there. With it jacked up and on a stand, I took the wheel off and gave the drum a good scrub. I backed the adjuster out but could still not turn the drum. Looking in from the back, I could see that the shoe wasn't retracting from the adjuster. I was able to get a punch in there and gave it a few taps. The shoe popped back and the drum loosened up.
Even with the CRC, it took close to 2 hours of flogging before the damn thing came off.
I put the drum I knocked the lip off onto the MK3 and refitted the tire.

We are supposed to get some really crap weather over the next few days, so I wrapped the hub and brake shoes with a tarp. It should stay dry.



At first glance, the drums look the same. When you look closer, the one off the MK3 is actually made of 2 sections. The face with the stud holes is a single flat disk that is welded to the outer tube that makes up the main drum body. The face is very soft and when I cleaned it up, I found a lot of marks made by hammering it between the studs while trying to free it up.
While cleaning both drums with the wire wheel on the grinder, I noticed that there was another difference.



As you can see in the first pic, there is a lip machined out of the back where is seats on the hub on the drums on the F1. The second pic is the inside of the drum off the MK3. I was a bit worried at first, thinking it wouldn't be any good, but then I realised that it was probably a mod dome so there was less metal contacting the hub, making it easier to remove. The drums locate on the inner face of the drum and both drums have the same thickness of metal there so it should be ok.

Another difference I found is that the old MK3 drum is a very different grade of steel. The new ones clean back to a nice clean grey metal colour. the older one stayed black, no matter how much I cleaned. I also noticed a lot more sparks from the wire wheel on the old drum.
I painted both of them with Ironize and I will prime them tomorrow.
Oh well, just 3 drums to go.

Greg.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 04:35:35 PM by Ravvin »

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2016, 06:48:42 PM »
During the week, I managed to clean, prime and paint the 2 brake drums.
If I get an answer to my question about what that lubricant in the brake unit is, I will get them back on and the last 3 off this weekend, with a bit of luck.

I had a bit of a look behind the dash to see what they had done to the wiring and it was pretty horrifying.
They have tried to rewire the indicators, using a new modern flasher unit, so the LED tail lights would work, but I don't think they had an actual wiring diagram. Or much of an understanding of basic electrical theory.
The bundle of wires coming out of the steering column that go to/from the indicator switch were mostly disconnected. Originally, there were 4 separate wires, each one running to one of the indicator bulbs. They had disconnected 2 of them and left them dangling. They then ran a length of 3 core extension lead from under the dash to the rear end of the truck as they couldn't work out which yellow wire ran where. They connected one of the Left indicator wires from the switch to the blue extension lead wire and a Right indicator wire to the brown. The earth wire was just left dangling.
Next, instead of working out the front indicators, they bought 2 little white LED lights, like trucks use for clearance lights, (or to make people think they are being overtaken by a mobile Christmas tree on dark nights), and joined the wires from these to the same bare copper joins they made with the extension lead under the dash. These little lights were then screwed to the front lip of the blackout light housings.
They left the original (live) metal fuse holder that supplied power to the flasher unit from the ignition switch just dangling freely under the dash. To get power to the new unit, they ran a wire with a 25A fuse from the battery to a toggle switch mounted to the dash and labelled "spot lights". From holes drilled in the tops of the radiator guard, I think they had spot lights mounted. The wiring is now gone, with just a small wire  with a 30A fuse running from the back of this switch to the new flasher unit. The wire from the other lug on the flasher unit is now joined to the feed wire to the indicator switch.
In theory, this should work and it took a bit before I discovered why it didn't. When they ran the spotlights, they never used a relay. The full current was running through that little switch screwed to the steel dash panel. When it melted internally, it shorted to the steel panel and blew the fuse near the battery. There was no outward sign that the switch was stuffed. I had replaced the fuse, which instantly popped when I closed the fitting, which made me get the multimeter out.
While I could just remove the switch and run the power feed from the original ignition-switched fuse holder and have it work, the rewiring they have done is just twisted wire joins and cheap electrical tape. It also leaves lots of live wires exposed and the indicator lights on the dash inoperative.
I'll get a decent flasher unit that can handle a mix of LED and regular bulbs, connect it up to the proper fused feeder wire and reconnect all of the original yellow wires.
I pulled one of the front indicator bulbs out to check what it was and it's just a standard 21/6w bayonet type. I'll get a couple of ultra-bright LED replacements to help with visibility.

The horn button on the steering wheel is stuck on, so they disconnected the wire coming out the bottom of the steering column from the horn and ran a new one to a little push-button next to the dodgy melted switch on the dash. They then powered this from the same wire that went to the flasher unit. So, melted switch/blown fuse meant no indicators or horn. I'll sort that out too.

While pulling an indicator bulb out, I thought I should see what these trucks used for a headlight bulb too. To save accidentally wrecking something important, I pulled the passenger side headlight out of my MK3, as it was already stuffed.



As you can see, the battery acid leaking down over the years has done something weird to the back of the headlight reflector. I could actually poke my finger through it. It felt like cellophane.
Anyway, I got the unit out and I'll take it in and see what replacement options are. It looks very similar to what used to be in my old Holden. Hopefully, I can get a modern housing that lets me run better bulbs. I'll fit relays too, to save cooking wiring and switches.
The dimmer switch for the headlights is missing too. Just a part of the base is still screwed to the floor. Our budding auto-lecky has also struck here. They simply bared all the ends and twisted the 4 wires together. Only 1 still has a number, 18, so it's the low beam. I will be able to work out the rest easily enough as one is the power supply and the other 2 are the high beam and the high beam indicating light on the dash. The way it is now, as soon as the light switch is turned on, it's trying to run both high and low beams at the same time. Surprised it hasn't had a melt-down. Nothing is soldered, just twisted together and a bit of tape wrapped around them and left to dangle down on the driver's feet.

While I'm poking around there I'll have to see why the air buzzer isn't doing anything.

Has anyone upgraded the headlights on their Inter without changing the actual look of the lights? I can always stick some LED spotlights on the brush guard, but you can't legally use them for regular low-beam driving, and I am trying to concentrate on doing what I need to do to get registered. (Except I seem to get sidetracked so easily). Then the real work will begin.

Greg.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 04:38:31 PM by Ravvin »

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #21 on: July 16, 2016, 08:07:23 AM »
Good work Greg!

With regard to the headlight upgrade; one of the cheapest and best upgrades is to fit heavier cable to the lamp i.e. high-beam; dip and earth. As close as you can get it to the lamp, fit a relay connecting it with the new heavier cable. The cable to the switch, can of course, remain as a lighter duty one.

I did this to my Discovery and Alpine (same lamps as the Inter) and the increase in brightness was so good, that I never used the new globes I had,

Cheers Charlie
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Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #22 on: July 16, 2016, 04:57:45 PM »
Thanks for that Charlie.
I had the same problem in my old Range Rover. The previous owner had put higher wattage bulbs in and it had melted the insides of the switch. I fitted relays and immediately got brighter lights and no more melting plastic smell from the dash.

Today I didn't get much done. I had to take the cat in to the vet for his yearly grease and oil change. Earliest I could get in was 10, so that disrupted most of the morning.
I made a list last night of bits I would need and managed to get an assistant at the local Repco that actually knew his stuff.
I showed him the mounting system for the old headlights and he dug through his books and told me he could get new bulbs for them, but they would still be 40/50W. There was nothing listed that was brighter. The other issue with using different bulbs would be that the shape of the reflector means that I would have low and high beam, but they would both shine straight ahead, potentially blinding oncoming drivers. No chance of that with the bulbs in it now.
He made a few calls and found another alternative. I still use the inner and outer mounting rings, but the whole reflector is replaced with a modern version that takes regular H4 bulbs. I will have to make an adaptor for the cables, but that is easy enough. I got the semi-sealed reflectors for $60 a pair, which is almost half price.
While there, I got a new high/low beam dip switch, a non-load dependant indicator flasher unit, new park/indicator bulbs, heatshrink and some heavy duty bullet connectors and spade lugs. The new headlight reflectors won't be in until later next week, but that's ok. I don't have the time to do them tomorrow.

Once home, I started by disconnecting and removing all of the added in wiring. It was surprising just how much there was, and this is without counting the heavy extension lead cable running to the back indicators.



With that all out of the way, I started reconnecting the original wires. As the rear indicators are not connected to the original wiring, I left those unplugged for now. I rewired the high/low beam dip switch and now the headlights work, although they are pretty dim. I'm only getting 11v at the dip switch, so I have a few connectors to clean or replace. The front parkers worked also.
I have power to the flasher unit, but it is not making it back through the indicator switch. I pulled the horn button out and found everything is missing from under it. I think there is supposed to be a spring and a contact, with a red wire running down the steering column and going to the horn. A previous owner had rewired the horn to work off a button on the dash, but I found the original wires at the bottom of the radiator. They have been cut short, so I will have to get under there when it's dry and try to work out where they connect to so I can replace them.
With the horn button out, I was able to undo the nut holding the steering wheel, but can't find my steering wheel puller. I've seen it a dozen times recently, and even remember putting all the different threaded bolts back in the kit after knocking it over, but can't remember where that was. I need a big shed.
Once I get the wheel off, I can pull the indicator switch out and give it a clean. At the worst, Iveco still sell the whole assembly, so I can get a new one if this one is too far gone.
While trying to get the steering wheel off, I happened to look up at the circuit breaker panel and saw something odd with the wiring. I removed the cover and peeled back about 6" of tape and found that at some point, the wire bundle had rubbed against the top of the cover sheet, cutting through the tape and wearing into one of the wires. When I managed to separate the wires, as a couple were stuck together, I found that the worn wire had actually melted for about 4". It looked like a sausage when it splits open. The yellow insulation had curled back and melted to an adjoining wire, but luckily didn't short it out. Following the melted wire, I found it had been cut and joined to a short piece of green & yellow earth wire which went to one terminal of the low air buzzer. Which doesn't work. As the wire has been cut, I'll undo it and slip a length of heat shrink over the split section, then retape it and reshape it so it can't rub again.
While there, I checked with the multimeter and when the ignition is switched on, there is 12v to the buzzer. I ran a wire from the other terminal to ground, but it still didn't buzz, so I have to pull the whole circuit breaker panel out to get at the back of it. I'll get the damn thing working sooner or later, then work out how to disable it if it annoys me.  ;D
Something I forgot to check was the side clearance lights. Looking at the circuit diagram, they should connect to the 4th circuit breaker and come on with the Tail Light switch. May be an issue there as the tail lights didn't come on when I flipped that switch, but it is one of the things the previous owner has played with. I also noticed that there was nothing connected to the top of the 5th circuit breaker, which should be the wipers. I know the wiper arms are in a bucket on the cab floor and the drive cable is unscrewed above the windscreen, so there will probably be some work there. Something I noticed on the circuit diagram is that it shows both front and rear width lights. I don't recall seeing rear width lights on any of these trucks. I'm not even sure where you could safely mount them. Maybe it was an option that they later dropped. I don't have the actual Workshop Manual for the F1 & F2, just the RPS and Technical Manual.

As for the brakes, I did some more reading and found something. The MK3 Workshop Manual mentions filling the cavity behind the rubber cap in the pic below with Girling Brake Grease.



I searched the net and found a few mentions, unfortunately they are contradictory. One said it was a type of red rubber grease. Another said it was a type of Moly grease. A third said to use Girling red grease but never Girling white grease. The little bit of grease I found in one of the cavities was black and almost dry. It looked like Moly grease, but I've never seen Moly grease dry to an almost solid paste.
What I am finding after removing the drums is that some of the pistons that push the shoes apart are not sliding back in freely. The ones on the adjusters are even worse. Some of those I have had to tap back in with a drift and hammer before they would allow the drum to turn, even with the adjuster wound right out. If I have to, I'll pull them all down and clean/lube everything, but if I can get away with just repacking the cavity with grease and working the pistons in and out a few times until they are all lubed up, I'll do that.
 
Oh just remembered. I found this thing under the seat. I'm pretty sure it's off the truck somewhere as the bullet connectors match others under the dash.



It looks like a position switch, similar to what would be on a handbrake. Can anyone identify whether it is meant to be part of my truck or not? The end seems to be broken off and I can't find any numbers or letters on it.

Greg.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 04:43:38 PM by Ravvin »

Offline dodgeguy1942

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #23 on: July 16, 2016, 10:30:10 PM »
Can you tell Me which way the tap has to be turned to select either fuel tanks

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2016, 10:57:15 PM »


There you go.
So clockwise for front.

Greg.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 04:44:40 PM by Ravvin »

Offline dodgeguy1942

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2016, 08:09:33 AM »
Thankyou. Hoping to get my f1 started for the first time this week

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2016, 08:47:13 AM »


As for the brakes, I did some more reading and found something. The MK3 Workshop Manual mentions filling the cavity behind the rubber cap in the pic below with Girling Brake Grease.

I searched the net and found a few mentions, unfortunately they are contradictory. One said it was a type of red rubber grease. Another said it was a type of Moly grease. A third said to use Girling red grease but never Girling white grease. The little bit of grease I found in one of the cavities was black and almost dry. It looked like Moly grease, but I've never seen Moly grease dry to an almost solid paste.

Greg.

Forget the rubber grease, that is for lubricating the seals when installing them in the cylinders.

I have read about white grease in workshop manuals, but never used it.

I think your best plan is to ring a brake specialist and ask which grease to to use for lubricating linkages. It is of course very-high melting-point, so that it can't contaminate the linings,

Cheers Charlie

PS Found these links which you have probably already seen:
http://www.aa1car.com/library/2005/ic80560.htm
http://jrwadhams.co.uk/brake-linkage-grease.html
« Last Edit: July 17, 2016, 08:51:43 AM by Chazza »
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Offline STDDIVER

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2016, 01:30:15 PM »
Greg

When you get to the crane work lights, the inside of mine are badly corroded and I have sourced some round 18w LED lights from an auction for $9 each and these can be fitted within the existing plastic hella mountings to make the unit look the same but not require replacement globes ever. I am making up an exact size Perspex cover to contain the LED light within the front hella mount. I will test them to make sure that they don't get too hot inside the original mountings. Should be able to even re fit the original push/pull switches to original specifications. 

Keep up the great work - I really enjoy your reports, they have made me more committed to put more time in on my FI crane truck.

Learning a lot!  Thanks

Frank

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2016, 03:24:00 PM »
Thanks for that Frank. I haven't had a close look at the lights on the Abbey yet. I know one was taken off and it and the bracket are in the toolbox.
Charlie, I went into the local truck mechanic who is also the Iveco dealer and he agreed with you. He suggested a high melting-point grease, preferably with Moly as it forms a protective coat on exposed metal that helps prevent rusting until it gets serviced again.

I tried to do some forward planning by getting the bits I would need before the weekend for a change, but it ended up being pointless.
As the oil in the rear diff is contaminated with water and there are signs of it leaking on the back plate and brake drum, I decided I had better pull the axle, dismantle the brakes and hub, check the bearings and generally go over the whole thing. I managed to get the grease for the brake bits and the other grease for the wheel bearings but couldn't get the seals.
Iveco has no listing for either the inner or outer seal part numbers from the RPS. The local bearing place found that the inner seal is a cross-match for the SKF 38709 or 38703 but the outer one has them scratching their heads. It is listed as being 2.594" x 3.064" x 0.484", which is apparently a really weird size. I know why now.

Anyway, they suggested pulling it out and bringing it in to see if they could match it. I started out by draining the oil from the diff.



That doesn't look right. The stuff is so thick it was flowing like treacle. Didn't smell nice like treacle though.
Next I had to pull the axle. After a quick run into town to grab a couple of high tensile 1/2" UNC bolts, I cleaned the threads out in the axle flange and screwed them in.
The axle came out pretty easily, but the second the silicon bead between the axle flange and hub broke, this nasty slurry ran out. It looks like the oil has been mixing with the grease in the hub.
I slid the axle out and found this nasty stuff all along it.



It looked like rust flakes and it wiped off with a rag soaked in diesel. There is no pitting of the axle at all, so I am assuming it is from the inside of the axle housing. It wasn't actual hard flakes, or even grit. It was more like a rust paste. I'm not sure what to do about that. It would be a real nightmare to have to pull the diff centre out to clean it out. I'm thinking I might be able to pull the other side axle, dismantle both hubs and remove the stub axles (?), so that I only have the bare axle housing and diff centre. Then I could spray a lot of degreaser through it and maybe scrub it out a bit with a rag firmly fixed to a broom handle or something, and flush it all out through the diff drain bung. After that I could use something like a hot air paint stripper gun on it's lowest setting to blow air through it to dry out any moisture before putting it all back together. What do you all think?

These next pics are of the inside of the hub, showing the outer lock nut with seal, and the axle shaft with that same seal sitting on it.



This is where it gets weird. The seal fits into a recess machined into the outer lock nut. The inner opening of the seal is 2.28" or 57.89mm. The bearing area on the axle is 1.71" or 43.5mm. There is no way it could seal anything. The oil from in the diff can flow straight through and mix with the oil. Is this right?
Two things occur to me. The first is that maybe the rubber bit of the seal actually is meant to press up to the face of the axle flange, making a seal there. The second is that the seal is supposed to run on the machined bearing area of the axle, but that this is not the original axle. I could pull one of the other axles and compare things, but if they have all been changed out, it won't tell me anything.

If anyone has worked on one of these before and thinks they know what is going on, please let me know. I can't go any further or order parts until I get this cleared up.

On another matter, during the week my new headlights turned up. They are a semi-sealed housing, meaning they look like a standard old 7" sealed beam headlight, but they can take regular H4 halogen bulbs.
The best thing about these is that they actually have the exact same locating tabs, in the same places as the original Inter headlights, so they are a straight swap. The only difference will be that I need to fit relays and make up a short lead to connect the pins on the lights to the relays, and then connect them into the existing wiring. I will keep the original wiring and socket fittings and just connect wires to the high and low bean wires so I can trigger the relays, so that it's not trying to run the whole load through the truck's circuit breakers. I'll just have to do some tests to see if the original alternator can handle the higher wattage lights.

While I was out annoying the Iveco dealer, I picked up a new tappet cover gasket and an oil filter. $35 for the filter and it's genuine, made in NZ. Repco can get the Ryco equivalent ones in but they are $65. Next up, a new air filter. I thought of getting this one cleaned, but it looks like it has been washed before as the pleats are all wavey.

It's time to light the heater. Only 7.3 degrees outside, but it's blowing a gale and there are occasional showers of sleet and almost-snow. And I'm on the coast. My mum is inland a bit and 700m above sea level. She rang just before to say it had been snowing on and off since 3 this morning and there was just a bit over 6" on the ground.

Greg.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 04:59:17 PM by Ravvin »

Offline Ravvin

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  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #29 on: July 24, 2016, 03:27:16 PM »
Well, it looks like that is the correct seal and axle.
I pulled the axle on the other side and it's the same.



Not sure what happened to the colour in the first pic. That liquid dribbling out at the bottom is bright blue. It looks like this one has been leaking too.
So from what I can see, the flange face presses against the outer lip on the seal and that keeps the oil in the main axle housing from mixing with the grease in the wheel bearings.

Here's a close-up of the lock nut and seal.



I'll take it in tomorrow and see if they can find anything comparable.
Seeing as there is a machined section on the axle, right up near the flange, I wonder if it would be possible to get a seal that fits into the nut recess and runs on the machined section?
I'll ask and see.
What have people been using if the original part number, 52753HA, is unknown at Iveco? What is really odd is that the MK4 and F1 RPS's both list that as the part number, and they both describe it as a "Seal, Plain Encased" but the F1 RPS says it is 2.5" shaft Dia, by 3.1?2" bore dia. by 9/16" wide and the MK4 RPS says it is 2.594" shaft dia. by 3.064" bore dia. by 0.484" wide.

Hopefully they will have something similar. If not, I'm not sure what to do. It can't be good to have the diff oil mixing with the grease in the wheel bearings.

While I was out there I collected up the cover plates that I had taken off the backs of the hubs to check the brake pad linings.



They come up pretty clean after being sand-blasted. I'll prime and repaint them all, as I can do them inside when we have crap weather like we are getting now.

Greg.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 05:03:09 PM by Ravvin »