Author Topic: 109 GS Resto  (Read 52302 times)

Offline Ellard

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2012, 06:45:33 AM »
Hi there

Quote
I have been quoted $40 per wheel by a company called Hartech in Adelaide. This is for blasting and powder coating.

Thats a good price - can you PM me there contact details please

All the best

Wayne
« Last Edit: May 27, 2012, 01:43:08 PM by Ellard »
2 x SI 1958 LWB Fire Engine
1 x SII LWB 1961 Angus Firefly
1 x SIIA LWB 1963 Fire Tender (No 5 fire trailer)
1 x 110 48:005 Forward Command Podt

Offline Polizei

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2012, 12:36:27 PM »
Hartech Pty Ltd
Abrasive Blasting - Hindmarsh, SA
34 Adam St, Hindmarsh SA 5007, Australia
(08) 8340 3477

Offline Phoenix

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2012, 03:32:12 PM »
The paint/rust removal wheels are a new one to me, I've only ever seen, and used, the wire wheels. Where do they come from??
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Offline Vixen

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2012, 04:24:16 PM »
Flapper wheels are good too Phoenix. Available from hardwares, so I assume those others would be too (and I have not seen those either)

Offline Polizei

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2012, 06:30:46 PM »
They are from Bunnings. I think someone was using them on the AULRO forum as I hadn't heard of them either until then.

I think they are a little more expensive, than the wire wheels, but seem faster. Probably safer too

Offline DennisM

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #35 on: May 27, 2012, 07:41:29 PM »
G'day All,
Electric drills are not designed to use that type of gear, I mean it's your gear, but electric drills are meant to just what it says drill holes, not ?? radial pressure as you would using the drill will shorten the life of the tool, just my muddled thoughts, cheers Dennis
ps buy a angle grinder, use flapper sander wheels, or if you have a compressor a good quality die grinder (Chicago Pnuematics) and use the wire wheels, or again flapper discs,,. still good work though.

Offline Polizei

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #36 on: June 02, 2012, 07:27:29 PM »
Had some time in the shed today and made a tiny bit of progress.

I took the rear part of the exhaust off as there is a break next to an old weld. Hopefully I will be able to have this rewelded otherwise it will be a replacement. Where to folks get there exhausts?





Gave it a go with the rust remover wheel also. Came up pretty good.



After that I turned my attention to getting the thermostat housing off. Easy outs were no good. Grab-its were no good. Brute force - no good either!
The thermostat housing was very badly corroded so I went at it with the angle grinder. Once off there were a couple of bolt stumps protruding but I was still unable to move these. I think I am at the point of needing some expert assistance before I make the problem worse.







There is a heap of crud inside the housing itself. I flushed everything before I started, but obviously didn't do much! Is there a better way to clean the cooling system?


Offline Polizei

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #37 on: June 02, 2012, 07:32:04 PM »
Had a go with some Penetrene on the rear drums. Spreads very well



After that I also had a crack at tidying up and cleaning the air filter. It definitely hadn't been cleaned in a while! I have some grass reads that have somehow made their way into the wire mesh. I don't think I can get them all out. Will this be an issue?


And finally with a fresh coat of black.



Offline FFRMAN

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #38 on: June 02, 2012, 07:34:59 PM »

I took the rear part of the exhaust off as there is a break next to an old weld. Hopefully I will be able to have this rewelded otherwise it will be a replacement. Where to folks get there exhausts?

Hi,

I take my to a normal Exhaust workshop but cut off all the connection even those on the muffler, they will weld them on, it keeps it original

Regards
Scott
Lots...............
VMVC 251,

Offline Polizei

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #39 on: June 05, 2012, 09:53:12 PM »
Thanks Scott

Took the broken exhaust down to the local exhaust shop. Definitely the way to go. I have been quoted a couple of hundred bucks for a new rear section including muffler. Seemed reasonable $ wise. Should be ready by the end of the week...

Offline Chazza

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #40 on: June 06, 2012, 08:56:47 AM »
Good progress cobber!

For the broken studs on the cylinder head I usually do the following:
1. Sand or file the studs flat, being extremely careful not to sand the cylinder head itself. If the stud stands proud of the head that is a good thing.
2. With a very sharp prick-punch lightly mark the centre of the stud with the gentlest tap of a hammer.
3. Check that the punch mark is centred. If it is off-centre, put the punch in the mark and lean it over until is pointing towards the centre and give it another tap.
4. When the mark is centred, give it a firm whack to increase the depth of the mark, whilst the punch is plumb to the stud axis.
5. Select a HSS drill bit as a pilot - for a 1/4" stud I would use about a 3mm drill bit; generally a bit 1/2 the size of the tapping drill will work well on small studs - and then commence drilling. You will need at least one assistant with a good eye to help line the drill bit up to plumb. This is absolutely essential if the operation is to succeed.
6. Using frequent brushings of soluble oil on the bit, gauge how deep you have drilled by measuring the depth of the hole on the one you have the bolt in. You may even feel the drill bit break through into the cavity below the stud.
7. When the pilot hole is complete, commence drilling with the tapping-drill, which can be found from a tapping-chart if you know the diameter of the stud and preferably the thread. I bought a left hand drill bit some time ago, which can unwind a lightly stuck thread; in my case of the six fasteners I had to drill, it unwound one of them.
8. When you finished drilling two things are likely to have happened: if all went well the thread is still full of old stud, which can be carefully cleaned out with a taper-tap; or if you have drilled off-line, more work will be needed. In the second case you will need to purchase a re-thread kit such as Helicoil and follow the directions in the kit to restore the thread.

Finally before fitting the new studs you will need to consider the following: the originals rusted in place because water leaked from the cooling system and into the thread, so this needs to be remedied. So either use an anti-seize paste on the thread to protect it, or use a thread-locking fluid such as Loctite, which has the additional benefit of glueing the probably not-perfect-thread solidly in place onto the stud.

Let me know if you want me to make you a new housing,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline Polizei

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #41 on: June 06, 2012, 11:05:19 AM »
Thanks for the tips.

The old housing was destroyed when I tried to remove it. I imagine this would make it much harder to copy??

Anyway I might have a source on one form the uk.

Cheers

Offline Chazza

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #42 on: June 06, 2012, 07:26:12 PM »

The old housing was destroyed when I tried to remove it. I imagine this would make it much harder to copy??


Not necessarily; I have made new castings using originals in similar condition to yours before,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline aussiegregmac

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2012, 07:53:50 PM »
Re the mesh under the canopy.  I understood it was done in the late eighties to relieve the pressure from the Cam nets and poles that we started loading on top.  Greg  ;)
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Offline Polizei

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Re: 109 GS Resto
« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2012, 08:52:23 PM »
Re the mesh under the canopy.  I understood it was done in the late eighties to relieve the pressure from the Cam nets and poles that we started loading on top.  Greg  ;)

Thanks Greg. Makes sense!