Author Topic: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66  (Read 60049 times)

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #90 on: December 25, 2013, 06:22:14 PM »
A bit more info that you might be interested in Tommy. Just general knowledge, but handy if you are really interested in Bofors are the positions and job functions of the gun detachment. :)

Gun No.1...The Sargent who is responsible for overall training of the detachment and operation of the gun. His prime function in action is target selection as advised by information over the radio. He stands well to the rear of the gun.

Gun No2..The Gun Layer (usually, but not always a Lance Bombardier) who is responsible for aiming and firing the gun.Obviously seated in the firing position.

Gun No3..A Bombardier who is second in charge and responsible for fire control of the gun. He stands just behind the gun.

Gun No4.. A Gunner who stands on the loading platform and is responsible for the initial cocking of the gun via the H.O.L.(Hand Operating Lever) and feeding clips of ammunition (four rounds to a clip) into the Auto Loader. Also has a foot pedal to be used to fire the gun if needed.

Gun No. 5.. A Gunner who is responsible for loading clips of ammunition into the ammunition rack on the gun. He stands near the ammunition rack. Up to the late 1960's he was also responsible for operating the radio but this was changed as it was realised that in combat he would be too busy loading ammunition to properly operate the radio and keep the Sargent advised.

Gun No.6.. A Gunner who was the radio operator and he stayed close to the Sargent at the rear of the gun.


I hope this helps in your general knowledge of the operation of one of these guns and when you realise these guns can fire rounds at 120 rounds a minute in short bursts both the Gunners No.4 and No.5 are busy boys. :) :)
I might also add that in the photo of my gun detachment above it has a five man detachment, it was just after this the six man detachment was introduced. :) :)

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #91 on: December 25, 2013, 06:51:36 PM »
While on general knowledge, there are six gun detachments to a Section, which is commanded by a Lieutenant and two Sections to a Battery which is commanded by a Major. In our Battery (113 Light Anti-aircraft Battery) based at Newcastle we only had four guns (2 to each Section) permanently based there. We used to borrow two more when we had our annual fortnightly camp, so at the best of times we were only half strength. :)

There are three Batteries to a Regiment which is commanded by a Colonel. So that gives is a total of 36 Bofors, which is a fair bit of firepower......in theory :)
« Last Edit: December 25, 2013, 06:58:12 PM by Ausfree »

Offline Mike C

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #92 on: December 26, 2013, 03:55:05 AM »
Regiment CO = Lt Col? (rather than Col).

I was working at West Head Range many years ago, when two groups of Navy gunners were doing their quals (group 1) and checks (group 2) on the powered 40mm single mount. Group 1 were all newbies: slow, fumbly, first round way over , stops and starts ... they were under instruction and very, very new. Group 2 were doing a check: they were experienced gunners from a Patrol Boat and had worked as a crew for some time. From the 'go' signal, they were all fluid motion: everyone knew their part, and it was magic to watch: first round was loaded and away in an instant, landing a fraction high. Next was a fraction low, all subsequent rounds either struck or bracketed the offshore target. 16 rounds? (4 x 4 round clips?), with several ricochets off the moored bouy (you could see the tracer). Fantastic! Mr Bofors sure did invent a great gun!

Mike C

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #93 on: December 26, 2013, 10:54:54 AM »
Yeah, it was a long time ago (for me) and you are probably right that a half colonel commanded an artillery regiment. Anyrate, to watch a well-oiled gun detachment in action is indeed poetry in motion. Speaking as an ex-gun number 4 (loading number) by the time you grabbed a clip from the ammo rack and fed it into the auto loader and pushed down on it to assist feed it was time to reach over and grab another clip. All the time the gun was bouncing around so you braced your backside against the railing and had your legs apart so you did not fall over. You did not stop for a second it was constant-reach-feed-push-reach-feed-push. :D

It shows how versatile the Bofor was. It was primarily designed as a low altitude anti-aircraft gun and the Navy successfully utilized it in its secondary role (anti-tank) on its patrol boats. At its rate of firepower it could certainly make a pirate vessels and other small evil doing boat crews sit up and take notice. :D
« Last Edit: December 26, 2013, 11:05:12 AM by Ausfree »

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #94 on: January 05, 2014, 06:26:55 PM »
Thought I would bump this Thread back to page one, in case anybody is looking for it. ;D

Offline Carzee

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #95 on: January 06, 2014, 08:51:22 PM »
I'm thinking the thread would live better in the Series 2 research section. Can we move it please.

Tommy

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #96 on: January 06, 2014, 09:23:02 PM »
I'm thinking the thread would live better in the Series 2 research section. Can we move it please.

Ross

I think it should go in the 'Overseas Deployment' research section :)

Offline Carzee

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #97 on: January 15, 2014, 10:21:12 AM »
Hmmm, well do we move all the SVN threads here as well... could do.

Another muddy road pic to go with those above, 24 Construction Sqn. in Sabah, central North Borneo.

So how effective are tyre chains?


Offline dugite

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #98 on: January 15, 2014, 10:25:30 AM »
Hmmm, well do we move all the SVN threads here as well... could do.

Another muddy road pic to go with those above, 24 Construction Sqn. in Sabah, central North Borneo.

So how effective are tyre chains?



tyre chains are very effective in those type of conditions

BTW - is it posed ? - he doesn't look too muddy
2a 109 114-341,
No.5 173-589,
W/S Platform 178-000,
PT1 204-796

Offline Carzee

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #99 on: January 15, 2014, 10:31:20 AM »
"..doesn't look too muddy."

Actually, neither does the mudguard. Maybe a Pravda-type re-enactment. And W.J. Cunneen was an official army photographer.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2014, 10:33:15 AM by Carzee »

Offline Mike C

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #100 on: January 15, 2014, 11:59:32 AM »
Bill Cunneen was still at it (taking pics) in the 1990s: I spent a few days in company with him during Ex Northern Predator in the mid-1990s.

Mike C

Offline Carzee

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #101 on: February 22, 2014, 09:06:54 PM »
I have found another two Series 2 photos in an AWM document pertaining to 24 Construction Sqn in Sabah '65





Here is a summary of Series 2 Land-Rover mechanical problems in service - remember it was mud and creek crossings (see point 17) all day long... every day...




Offline Carzee

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #102 on: February 22, 2014, 09:14:59 PM »
I find it interesting that some Army Series 2 and all Series 2A have deleted the valance panel, modesty panel or whatever its called (the panel 4.5in wide that was fitted under the doors from mudguard to mudguard).
The Series 2 88in generally have the panels fitted. The 109s are a mix. I don't think the panels would've been removed in service, rather they were "deleted" when constructed.

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #103 on: June 02, 2014, 04:42:04 PM »
Just catching up here, I wondered where this Thread had been shifted to. :)

Offline Phoenix

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #104 on: June 02, 2014, 05:02:59 PM »
I find it interesting that some Army Series 2 and all Series 2A have deleted the valance panel, modesty panel or whatever its called (the panel 4.5in wide that was fitted under the doors from mudguard to mudguard).
The Series 2 88in generally have the panels fitted. The 109s are a mix. I don't think the panels would've been removed in service, rather they were "deleted" when constructed.

On this, here is the EMEI!  http://www.remlr.com/emei-S2.html  http://www.remlr.com/documents/EMEI/Series%202/G027-14%20-%20Removal%20of%20Sill%20Panels.pdf
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