Author Topic: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66  (Read 60048 times)

Offline Chazza

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #75 on: October 14, 2013, 09:42:14 AM »
Interesting video!

I love the camouflage on the Bofors in the last scene - I never would have guessed that there was gun underneath that lot!

The load-angles on the tow chain as it was winched into the aircraft, made me feel faint as well,

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Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #76 on: October 14, 2013, 08:49:56 PM »
Yes, very interesting video. I would say the "camouflage" in the last scene was a rushed job, set up for the camera. We used proper Cammo nets and the planes we loaded our Bofors into were Hercules C130A's.  But I am talking late 1960's whereas that filmclip was made in the early 1960's. :D
I enjoyed it, thanks again Tommy, brings back memories. :) :)

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #77 on: October 14, 2013, 09:09:17 PM »
This piccy may be of interest to people on this Thread interested in Bofors. ;D It was taken about 1969 down at Tianjara after we flew in by Hercules from Williamtown. ;D
 We had the gun partially dug in when the photographer turned up, so it was "posed" for the camera. Thats me looking over the shoulder of the gun No 2 (The Layer) at this point in time I was the Gun number 1 (Seargent) and my correct position is behind the Bombardier who is standing at the rear of the gun. The gun is "G" for Golf or "Little Jinx" as it was affectionaly called by the gun detachment :D Note the Inter Mk3 in the background.


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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #78 on: October 14, 2013, 09:42:57 PM »
Nice photo Ausfree :)

In an emergency, would the muzzle cover be removed or would you simply shoot through it and replace it with a spare?

BTW, where would I find the 'Bristol Bofors' data plate on the No.12 gun?

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #79 on: October 14, 2013, 11:13:31 PM »
This piccy may be of interest to people on this Thread interested in Bofors. ;D It was taken about 1969 down at Tianjara after we flew in by Hercules from Williamtown. ;D
Did you fly into Albatross or the dirt strip up near Tianjara falls?

Often used to see various units on the plateau and out on the RAN Beecroft Range near Currarong.  Always made one's head turn.  :)

I remember back in the late 1960s or early 1970s on the Beecroft Range a gunner was killed by a lightning strike hitting a Bofors he was standing next to.  :(

Offline Mike C

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #80 on: October 15, 2013, 09:10:56 AM »
Interestingly,

Inter No1 Mk3 170130 also had service later in SVN (RTA in April 1970), and 170138 is now held by the AWM in Canberra.

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Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #81 on: October 15, 2013, 01:29:21 PM »
This piccy may be of interest to people on this Thread interested in Bofors. ;D It was taken about 1969 down at Tianjara after we flew in by Hercules from Williamtown. ;D
Did you fly into Albatross or the dirt strip up near Tianjara falls?

Often used to see various units on the plateau and out on the RAN Beecroft Range near Currarong.  Always made one's head turn.  :)

I remember back in the late 1960s or early 1970s on the Beecroft Range a gunner was killed by a lightning strike hitting a Bofors he was standing next to.  :(
No, we flew into the Naval air station at Jervis Bay and the guntowers met us there ( they were driven down from Newcastle) and towed the guns to Tianjara. :D

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #82 on: October 15, 2013, 01:36:02 PM »
Tommy, regarding the muzzle cover. As I said, that piccy was posed and I am out of position. The muzzle cover takes 2 seconds to whip off. ;D As far as the data plate is concerned, I can't really remember, it was after all  45 years ago. I'll ask around and get back to you. They have a couple of Bofors up at Fort Scratchley  in Newcastle so I will give them the once over and get some photo's if I can.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 01:40:35 PM by Ausfree »

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #83 on: November 13, 2013, 09:35:40 PM »
Tommy, regarding the muzzle cover. As I said, that piccy was posed and I am out of position. The muzzle cover takes 2 seconds to whip off. ;D As far as the data plate is concerned, I can't really remember, it was after all  45 years ago. I'll ask around and get back to you. They have a couple of Bofors up at Fort Scratchley  in Newcastle so I will give them the once over and get some photo's if I can.

G'day Jim

A couple of weeks back I had a look at a No.12/Mk12 Bofors a friend of mine has. I found the plate on the gun itself and not the chassis. Not sure if there is a separate plate for the chassis as I could not find one. This particular Bofors is remarkably complete with only a few parts missing. Unfortunately, the powerpack used to power up the gun is AWOL :(.

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #84 on: November 14, 2013, 09:56:28 AM »
Have we located any landrovers thyat ended up in SVN? (I assume workshops etc most likely)


I also notice doors off driving (later adopted in SVN).
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Offline Uncle Ho

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #85 on: November 14, 2013, 01:05:11 PM »
 The doors off probably started in the times of the Confrontation as a cooling means,and carried over into SVN as also a means of quick exit.

It is interesting to note the rear pic of the Mk3 being loaded onto the Sydney had the Pentropic unit sign, this I believe was also on the early SVN vehicles.

ZuluDelta 354 could confirm this.

Offline Uncle Ho

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #86 on: November 14, 2013, 01:19:39 PM »
In regards to the green truck with the Marsden Matting, I would say it's a Lend Lease Chevrolet or GMC/Maple Leaf (civilian pattern) with local adapted headlights.

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #87 on: December 15, 2013, 07:21:43 PM »
Tommy, regarding the muzzle cover. As I said, that piccy was posed and I am out of position. The muzzle cover takes 2 seconds to whip off. ;D As far as the data plate is concerned, I can't really remember, it was after all  45 years ago. I'll ask around and get back to you. They have a couple of Bofors up at Fort Scratchley  in Newcastle so I will give them the once over and get some photo's if I can.

G'day Jim

A couple of weeks back I had a look at a No.12/Mk12 Bofors a friend of mine has. I found the plate on the gun itself and not the chassis. Not sure if there is a separate plate for the chassis as I could not find one. This particular Bofors is remarkably complete with only a few parts missing. Unfortunately, the powerpack used to power up the gun is AWOL :(.

G'Day Tommy, sorry mate I haven't been on this Forum for a while. Wow, I love the piccies of the Bofor, it does look remarkably complete. I wish I lived closer. I have not had a chance to return to Fort Scratchley to look at the two Bofors they have up there.

I have spoken to a number of ex-CMF personal and they tell me that people who are interested in Bofors nowadays and never served on them are mystified on how you pull them apart for maintenance. If the sequence is not correct you can damage the gun badly, because of the weight involved with the barrel on one end and the Auto loader on the other end. They must be pulled apart in the correct order to keep the gun in balance, otherwise you are in for a rude shock when the gun suddenly drops at one end or the other.

the sequence as I remember are the letters BBABB..

B for the buffer, which is under the barrel, this comes off first.
B for the breech mechs, which is removed next.
A for the Auto Loader, which is removed from the rear of the gun.
B for the barrel, which is removed next and finally....
B for the Breech Ring.

Of cause to do all this there are special tools involved and I believe most of these are missing nowadays. Without these tools, particularly for the Auto loader, it would be difficult.

I notice in the second photo the gun sight (peanut sight) is missing which used to slide into the mounting bracket. Also I see in front of where the gun layer sits is the triangular shaped hand controls, the layer would place is hands on the hand control and slide them down to the switches, which you can see in the photo. This would turn the electric motor on which would enable the gun to elevate and traverse. at the front of that control is the twin triggers which would be reached by the layers fingers to enable him to fire the gun.

The gun no. 4 (the loading number) also has a foot pedal to fire the gun, as a back up to the primary firing method.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 07:36:23 PM by Ausfree »

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #88 on: December 15, 2013, 07:44:32 PM »
I went to the "Warbirds Downunder" show at Temora early last month and thoroughly enjoyed the day. :) While there I saw this Bofor which had been modified by taking the guts of it out and replacing it with electronic gear to make it sound like a real Bofor firing. I didn't make myself known, but I got this piccy. :)


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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #89 on: December 18, 2013, 08:04:44 PM »
Tommy, regarding the muzzle cover. As I said, that piccy was posed and I am out of position. The muzzle cover takes 2 seconds to whip off. ;D As far as the data plate is concerned, I can't really remember, it was after all  45 years ago. I'll ask around and get back to you. They have a couple of Bofors up at Fort Scratchley  in Newcastle so I will give them the once over and get some photo's if I can.

G'day Jim

A couple of weeks back I had a look at a No.12/Mk12 Bofors a friend of mine has. I found the plate on the gun itself and not the chassis. Not sure if there is a separate plate for the chassis as I could not find one. This particular Bofors is remarkably complete with only a few parts missing. Unfortunately, the powerpack used to power up the gun is AWOL :(.

G'Day Tommy, sorry mate I haven't been on this Forum for a while. Wow, I love the piccies of the Bofor, it does look remarkably complete. I wish I lived closer. I have not had a chance to return to Fort Scratchley to look at the two Bofors they have up there.

I have spoken to a number of ex-CMF personal and they tell me that people who are interested in Bofors nowadays and never served on them are mystified on how you pull them apart for maintenance. If the sequence is not correct you can damage the gun badly, because of the weight involved with the barrel on one end and the Auto loader on the other end. They must be pulled apart in the correct order to keep the gun in balance, otherwise you are in for a rude shock when the gun suddenly drops at one end or the other.

the sequence as I remember are the letters BBABB..

B for the buffer, which is under the barrel, this comes off first.
B for the breech mechs, which is removed next.
A for the Auto Loader, which is removed from the rear of the gun.
B for the barrel, which is removed next and finally....
B for the Breech Ring.

Of cause to do all this there are special tools involved and I believe most of these are missing nowadays. Without these tools, particularly for the Auto loader, it would be difficult.

I notice in the second photo the gun sight (peanut sight) is missing which used to slide into the mounting bracket. Also I see in front of where the gun layer sits is the triangular shaped hand controls, the layer would place is hands on the hand control and slide them down to the switches, which you can see in the photo. This would turn the electric motor on which would enable the gun to elevate and traverse. at the front of that control is the twin triggers which would be reached by the layers fingers to enable him to fire the gun.

The gun no. 4 (the loading number) also has a foot pedal to fire the gun, as a back up to the primary firing method.

G'day Jim

Well you learn something new everyday :). I will need to pass the 'dismantling sequence' on to my mate.

The hand control now makes sense. The bottom lever is a safeguard, I presume, to avoid any unforeseen activation of the electrics by accidental knocking of hand control. The gunner would have to be seated and in control of the weapon before engaging the lever. By then all personnel would be in position and ready for action.