Author Topic: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66  (Read 55299 times)

Offline AGAS 5

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #30 on: September 28, 2013, 05:26:56 PM »
Thanks Tommy, a very nice bit of work.

There was a memorial service held on 31 Aug for the Indonesian Confrontation and the Malayan Emergency. Details are on page 24/25 of the latest Army news paper.

http://armynews.realviewdigital.com/#folio=1

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« Last Edit: September 28, 2013, 06:04:55 PM by AGAS 5 »
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Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2013, 05:53:31 PM »
Tommy, only too happy to help with any info that I can on Bofor's. :D You mentioned about the charger on the back of the L/70, our Mk 12's had JAP  brand 2 stroke chargers mounted on the back of the loaders platform, we also used a a 4 stroke off gun charger unit which had a higher capacity than the JAP to charge the batteries. ;D You can actually see the JAP charger and the tool box on the loaders platform in that first photo.



You can also see them in this piccy of a Bofor at a live firing excercise at Fort Wallace, Stockton in about 1966. That's me standing on the gun platform as the Loading Number, Gun Number 4. We had names for our Bofor's, this one was called "Little Jinx".
« Last Edit: September 28, 2013, 06:17:57 PM by Ausfree »

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2013, 09:07:53 PM »
Tommy, only too happy to help with any info that I can on Bofor's. :D You mentioned about the charger on the back of the L/70, our Mk 12's had JAP  brand 2 stroke chargers mounted on the back of the loaders platform, we also used a a 4 stroke off gun charger unit which had a higher capacity than the JAP to charge the batteries. ;D You can actually see the JAP charger and the tool box on the loaders platform in that first photo.

Great photo Ausfree :)

It looks as if the 'Jap' charger was started by pulling on a cord. If so, how many times did it play up and not start like so many 2 strokes of that era? Not good if enemy aircraft are baring down on you.

Was the 'external' genset something like that shown below?
« Last Edit: September 28, 2013, 09:22:34 PM by Tommy »

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2013, 09:30:17 PM »
Thanks Tommy, a very nice bit of work.

There was a memorial service held on 31 Aug for the Indonesian Confrontation and the Malayan Emergency. Details are on page 24/25 of the latest Army news paper.

http://armynews.realviewdigital.com/#folio=1

Pete

Amazing how it took the Australian Government 45 years to 'recognise' this historical military event. Must have been all that red tape we hear about.

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2013, 05:17:35 PM »
The following photos are of A Field Battery.

A Field Battery secured the use of British Army vehicles whilst in Malaysia (January 1965 - September 1967) as these photos show predominately British army Beford RL 3 ton GS and S2 Land Rovers. You can see the odd Australian army Land Rover (111-850 & 111-857) in a couple of the photos.

From 19651966 the Battery became known as 'A' Field Battery, 45th Light Regiment, Royal Artillery after joining up with the British Regiment. I presume this is why the Australians used British vehicles.

It appears that the Australian marked some of these vehicles with a white Kangaroo symbol. This symbol has been carried through to current war zones such as Afghanistan

 

 

 
« Last Edit: September 29, 2013, 06:01:23 PM by Tommy »

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #35 on: September 29, 2013, 05:21:40 PM »
A Field Regiment was equipped with the L5 105mm Pack Howitzer. These guns were light enough to be comfortably towed behind the Land Rovers although some photo show them in the back of the RLs.

 

 

 

« Last Edit: September 29, 2013, 06:04:29 PM by Tommy »

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #36 on: September 29, 2013, 05:27:50 PM »
Transporting the L5s over hills and rivers was no problem. The British airforce could airlift them with the Bristol Belvedere or they could be dismantled into pieces and sent by small boat.

These photos show the Belvedere doing it's thing.



 

These two photos show the correct way to sling the L5 for airlifting. You will note that one photo shows the L5 slung with legs extended and the other shows the L5 with legs retracted. As in the photo above (RHS), the gun has been correctly slung.

 
« Last Edit: September 29, 2013, 05:35:00 PM by Tommy »

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #37 on: September 29, 2013, 05:33:31 PM »
The L5 was a fully dismantable gun. This is evident in the photos below. Due to the nature of the terrain, transportation up river in small boats would prove to be ideal. This boat contains a completely disassembled L5.

 

Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2013, 07:25:14 PM »
Tommy, only too happy to help with any info that I can on Bofor's. :D You mentioned about the charger on the back of the L/70, our Mk 12's had JAP  brand 2 stroke chargers mounted on the back of the loaders platform, we also used a a 4 stroke off gun charger unit which had a higher capacity than the JAP to charge the batteries. ;D You can actually see the JAP charger and the tool box on the loaders platform in that first photo.

Great photo Ausfree :)

It looks as if the 'Jap' charger was started by pulling on a cord. If so, how many times did it play up and not start like so many 2 strokes of that era? Not good if enemy aircraft are baring down on you.

Was the 'external' genset something like that shown below?
  You are correct Tommy, the JAP charger was a mongrel of a thing to start and yes it did have a pull cord. The picture of the Genset (I couldn't remember it's name) is correct, they were more reliable than the JAP and had a greater charging rate. :)

Offline aussiegregmac

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2013, 07:56:00 PM »
This is great Tommy.  What great photos.
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Offline Richard Farrant

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #40 on: September 29, 2013, 08:35:35 PM »
Tommy, only too happy to help with any info that I can on Bofor's. :D You mentioned about the charger on the back of the L/70, our Mk 12's had JAP  brand 2 stroke chargers mounted on the back of the loaders platform, we also used a a 4 stroke off gun charger unit which had a higher capacity than the JAP to charge the batteries. ;D You can actually see the JAP charger and the tool box on the loaders platform in that first photo.


Hi Ausfree,
I am interested in this thread as a friend has a Mk.12 Bofors without a charging set. I identified it as what appears to be the set used during WW2 in conjunction with the RAF's Trolley Accumulators for aircraft starting. They were mounted on top of the trolley. Now these engines were definitely side valve 4 strokes as I am familiar with the JAP 2A and 2S (only real difference is sump capacity). As the Mk12 was an electric conversion by the Bristol Aircraft Co. you can see how they came across this set and considered it a neat size to fit the platform. As you were there at the time and used them it is difficult to dispute your comment on them being a two stroke engine, but all info that has been gleaned to date on the sets for the Bofors is that they were JAP 2S four strokes, but would be interested to see any documents to say otherwise as we are looking for one of these sets.

regards Richard
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Offline Ausfree

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #41 on: September 29, 2013, 08:51:44 PM »
Tommy, only too happy to help with any info that I can on Bofor's. :D You mentioned about the charger on the back of the L/70, our Mk 12's had JAP  brand 2 stroke chargers mounted on the back of the loaders platform, we also used a a 4 stroke off gun charger unit which had a higher capacity than the JAP to charge the batteries. ;D You can actually see the JAP charger and the tool box on the loaders platform in that first photo.


Hi Ausfree,
I am interested in this thread as a friend has a Mk.12 Bofors without a charging set. I identified it as what appears to be the set used during WW2 in conjunction with the RAF's Trolley Accumulators for aircraft starting. They were mounted on top of the trolley. Now these engines were definitely side valve 4 strokes as I am familiar with the JAP 2A and 2S (only real difference is sump capacity). As the Mk12 was an electric conversion by the Bristol Aircraft Co. you can see how they came across this set and considered it a neat size to fit the platform. As you were there at the time and used them it is difficult to dispute your comment on them being a two stroke engine, but all info that has been gleaned to date on the sets for the Bofors is that they were JAP 2S four strokes, but would be interested to see any documents to say otherwise as we are looking for one of these sets.

regards Richard
Hi Richard, I made an assumption on the fact they were 2 strokes ( it was a long time ago) however I am still in contact with other ex members of 113 Battery and I will contact them to check. I will get back to you.
Cheers Ausfree.

Offline 303Gunner

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #42 on: September 29, 2013, 09:20:40 PM »
The Aust Army also used Cooper engine charging sets, branded as "Sunshine" and distributed through the Sunshine-McKay agricultural chain..

Offline Richard Farrant

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #43 on: September 29, 2013, 10:56:32 PM »
The Aust Army also used Cooper engine charging sets, branded as "Sunshine" and distributed through the Sunshine-McKay agricultural chain..

That is interesting as we had heard Cooper mentioned but not found any evidence to confirm. As I said, my friend in Aus, is looking for one of these sets.
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Offline armyjeep52

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Re: Australian Army Vehicles - Indonesian Confrontation 1963-66
« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2013, 11:52:16 AM »
Good day gents,
A few years ago I put a lot of ARN,s on the old website for the Borneo trucks and Land rovers, I don't think it has made it across to this forum.
A couple of days ago I was looking at a video on the Australian War Memorial site . The film No is F03659 and is called  HMAS Sydney underway to Borneo 1964.
The ARN,s I could pick out with a quick look through are,
Landrover 110-820,108-614,111-906
AB 160 Inter tipper 116-426,116-412,116-415 (so close to mine and according to War Diaries mine was in Borneo also)
Mk 3 International 170-277,170-190,170-191,170-193
No 5 trailer 101-094,101-109
Corio Air Engineers 1 ton trailers 100-551,100-553,100-557.       
The film goes for 55 mins and is reasonably entertaining for the most part.
Cheers Ken
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S2A AMB 112-226  S2A WRECKER 176-311     
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