Author Topic: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?  (Read 31486 times)

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #105 on: September 15, 2019, 09:42:11 AM »
Iíll slowly delete the Photobucket images and replace them with my archived images as time allows.

I found a few other pictures today that might be appreciated here, though theyíre not military.
Theyíre of a civilian Series 2 or 2a I stumbled across while negotiating the back streets on a place called Lampang in Thailand.
I was in the area seeking emergency surgery and while taking a short cut I spotted this vehicle and couldnít help  stopping and walking back to suss it out more closely. As sick as I was, I just had to check it out.

This is the best kept original Land Rover I have ever seen in my life and rest assured, Iíve seen a few.

I tracked down the owner and was even more surprised to discover that this vehicle is owned and maintained by a middle aged Thai woman.

*Apologies for the reflection of my silk shirt in these pictures. I didnít realise the shirt was reflecting and by the time I got back to my vehicle and checked the photos it was too late, I was too exhausted to make the walk back.


« Last Edit: September 15, 2019, 10:01:58 AM by navigation »

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #106 on: September 23, 2019, 08:16:28 PM »
Phew, the 109 GS will be arriving in Brisbane tomorrow morning so Iíll finally get a chance to look it over and see how it fares after all these years.
The transport driver carrying it related that he was waylaid at his first stop by a Land Rover enthusiast who was pressing him for information in it.
Apparently itís still looking good.
Tomorrow we will finally meet again...

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #107 on: September 24, 2019, 05:11:49 AM »
I was sent this image by my brother during the night.
I wasnít sleeping very well and after seeing my old army truck loaded upon the carrier, well that woke me up fully.
Apparently itís still in good nick after all this time.
Itís going to be interesting having it back.
Here I was thinking Iíd be content simply building and firing competition combat style handguns for the rest of my days and that Iíd be satisfied with that.







Offline Carzee

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #108 on: September 24, 2019, 03:16:58 PM »
Still looks the goods alright.
I wonder if there will be many oil drips on the floor of that trailer...

Offline fc101

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #109 on: September 24, 2019, 04:07:22 PM »
Mister Navigation - did you used to own a yellow LWB or wagon that had a Holden 253 and I think a Cabstar gearbox?

If so - what happened to it?

Cheers

Garry

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #110 on: September 24, 2019, 06:53:56 PM »
Still looks the goods alright.
I wonder if there will be many oil drips on the floor of that trailer...

Yep, it appears there may have been a few as my brother reported that due to lack of use and being parked on gravel for a few years, the front and rear main seals appear to have failed somewhat, though Iím yet to investigate that yet as I only had time to unload it and park it out of the way as I still have regular work to do before I can divert some time towards looking it over.

I think he said the transfer case had a minor leak also, and Iím pretty sure I know where that would be coming from as the Ashcroft High Speed transfer box isnít designed to mate to a Nissan 5 speed overdrive box and when mated, there was a small gap up the top that couldnít be sealed routinely, so I sealed it with a heavy sealant and that did the job at the time, thus my guess is that itís wept from that point.

Iíll know more once I crawl underneath.

Not really surprised if the front and rear mains have leaked after sitting so long.

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #111 on: September 24, 2019, 06:56:49 PM »
Mister Navigation - did you used to own a yellow LWB or wagon that had a Holden 253 and I think a Cabstar gearbox?

If so - what happened to it?

Cheers

Garry

No Sir, not me.

Iím not personally aware of any of these things sporting a 253, though Iíve heard tales of the odd one being done back in the day.


Offline fc101

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #112 on: September 24, 2019, 07:06:56 PM »
Oh Ok - thanks was obviously someone else then.

Cheers

Garry

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #113 on: October 09, 2019, 09:08:57 PM »
Finally had time to have a quick look over the 109 today, after walking past it and around it numerous times every day since its arrival.

Been a long time since I built it and a few minor things have been changed since I last saw it.

Tíwas a bit of a trip down memory lane.

I was trying to get my head around an electrical glitch thatís interfering with the thermo fan via the electric water pump controller and found an issue with the under bonnet fuse box as well as a stand alone heavy duty fuse powering the thermo fan itself.
It appears the fuse holder terminals had a tiny bit of corrosion on them, limiting contact and heating up the fuse to where it was kind of melting the plastic at one end of the fuse....hmmm.

Itís got a minor fuel leak from a hose exiting the electric fuel pump.

Itís running a bit crook, hunting...

I checked the distributor cap and the terminals are a bit corroded though not overly.

Canít quite fathom the hunting..., sort of feels like a vacuum leak, or itís just the miss thatís given that impression.

Some wiring has been fiddled with since I owned it last so Iíll have to really suss it all back out.

If anyone has a spud bag full of motivation laying around that they donít want, send it my way...


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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #114 on: October 09, 2019, 11:46:25 PM »
I did note a few other things as I climbed over it and under it and I was a bit surprised at how I sort of jumped straight back into it, like I was running on autopilot.

I really like how you can just dive underneath it and scootch along from end to end pretty much, without needing to jack it up.

Never bumped my head once, oddly enough...

Did cringe at having to carefully place my knees atop the brush bar so as to lean all the way to the back of the cylinder head as I ran along checking the studs for tension.
All were tight, as was everything I checked.
The knees donít like it much as theyíre peppered with shrapnel from when I was young and brave...

The ceramic wrap on the extractors has perished and looks ordinary, so that will need to be addressed at some stage.

Thinking that I best tackle the electrical glitches first, just to save hassles later, because Iím kind of leaning towards stripping out all the gear and parts that are packed in it, then giving it a bit of a clean inside and out, and putting it into service as my daily driver once more.

A mate stopped by before I left work and he commented that it sounded like it had a bit of a cam in it, and was clearly surprised when I told him it does, though not a really big one.

Iím guessing my old timing light is packed away in the back somewhere, so thatíll need to be dug out soon.
My brother reported that the plastic distributor drive gear failed a year or two back, and he replaced it with a steel one.
He said he never timed it after that so the timing is way out.

I did note the inline tap Iíd placed in the vacuum advance supply line was turned off too, so I quickly turned that back onto full signal, so yeah, the vacuum advance will be working again now.
For anyone scratching their head as per the vacuum advance pressure limiting tap...itís a part of another modification I was meddling with before I spat the dummy and sold the vehicle.

Because the engine is worked a little bit, I utilise an Edelbrock water/methanol injection system as well as a Crane Cams Hi6 capacitive discharge unit, with a Crane Cams PS91 ignition coil with ICE spark plug leads, which feed up to 120 sparks per trigger event, yes you read it correctly, up to 120 sparks per trigger event, to the Brisk Premium LGS spark plugs.

Back in 2012 I was running a Plasma ignition system on it @4.7μF and sometimes up to 1 joule, along with a computer controlled ignition system that allowed me to adjust the impedance at the spark plug, but that was then and this is now.

The prototype ignition equipment arrived with the 109 too, so I can always buggerize around with that again if I get the urge, and as much as people really want me to get back into that, Iím unsure if I wanna venture back down that path.

Back in the day, I was testing a serious ignition system that utilised high energy radiant plasma as the ignition source, burning anything as fuel.

Seems like forever ago, but apparently I was the first person in 12 years to defeat the thermodynamic equation in a Class A test conducted at the NSW, RTA, EPA, testing facility at 5 Lord Street Botany NSW. Ho hum...

I still have the paperwork from the tests though I donít like to look at that data these days, life goes on...

For anyone interested, the test vehicle was running on LPG and petrol, though it was also plumbed to run on methane at a later date. We were looking at running it on ammonia down the track too.

There was a hydrogen booster plumbed in by another bloke who reckoned it was the be all to end all, and had nothing whatsoever to do with me, and with him safely out of the country and therefore unable to interfere with the testing, the investor pressured me into testing it, regardless of my opinion that it was a waste of time, but alas, after concluding my Class A ignition test on LPG, then petrol, and nailing it, the investor got me to test the hydrogen booster as he was quite convinced it was spectacular and just wouldnít listen to my advices, so I begrudgingly performed the test, with all due diligence, as one does, even when one is loathe to, and sure enough it was as I predicted, the hydrogen booster did virtually nothing.

Anyway, what happened in the months after successfully nailing the test, things moved very quickly and it appeared as though life was about to get quite interesting.
It was due to be demonstrated publicly at the 2012 Sports Compact Jambouree at Willowbank, where we were sponsoring the whole shebang, but 11 days from launch, the investor got greedy and decided he wanted 50%.
I didnít like it but was in so deep, I had to grin and bare it, then the following morning he pitched that he wasnít happy with 50% and was taking 75%. I didnít comment, I just stood up and started unplugging my laptop from the dual 50 inch monitors I was using, and that was that, I packed all my stuff and walked away.

 Thatís what did my head in and made me wanna change my life and get away from everything.

I did still help blokes out for a while with sourcing spark plugs and other items for them to jazz their Land Rovers up for better power and fuel economy and they were all wrapped.
Then I decided to drop off the planet for a while.

Before I dropped out of sight I did have the privilege of testing the ignition on a world record holding race car, which was really interesting, as it got me in touch with a very capable tuner, who got his degree at Melbourne University Thermodynamics unit under my idol, Professor Harry Watson, who still to this day, or so I believe, holds the world record for efficiency from a hydrogen fuelled engine.

I donít have anything against hydrogen, I love the stuff, but I was into atomic hydrogen, not some gumboot backyard stainless...percolator.
Back in 2008 I was involved with a project in Italy, using a supercharged radial engine running on bottled hydrogen, and it was that project that led to my designing and developing the Nascent Plug, named after the hydrogen species we were using at the time.

It was a very serious spark plug, capable of running at 10 Joule, and it blew everyoneís mind, including the 3 physicists tasked with assessing my tests at Botany.
It had them completely baffled, and was fun to demonstrate.
Those were fun times, especially when Iíd publicly release information about my findings, only to be met with barefaced ridicule, and then a foreign physics department would replicate my tests and confirm my findings in the top scientific journals.

So you see lads, owning a Land Rover can lead you up some rough tracks alright...

Sorry for the rant but some of the old timers here might enjoy the read, as some of them were following my progress back then and were always keen for updates.

So yeah, thatís a little bit about me and my 109, which was my primary test vehicle back in the day.

Iím not really sure how Iíll go getting the 109 back up to scratch as I seldom have spare time and time isnít on my side health and fitness wise but Iíll try my best to get motivated.

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #115 on: October 10, 2019, 12:18:08 AM »
Hereís a sneaky picture from way back when I started toying with plasma.

Those are 16 kV microwave oven blocking diodes which I was using until I was able to get custom made ones.

Back then the quest was performance, but the attendant fuel economy came as a bit of a surprise.

I wasnít keeping notes at that stage but I was able to significantly increase the fuel economy, and Iím 100% positive that nobody here would believe how far I managed to stretch it.

It got crazy, very...

It seems like a lifetime ago, and I rarely think about it.

I shut it out because of the dramas it attracted.

Those were interesting times alright.


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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #116 on: October 10, 2019, 03:10:33 AM »
This is why every man and his dog tried to sue me.

This is the Nascent Plug, running at 2 joule.

Thereís a filter over the lense of the high speed camera but a keen observer will be able to get an idea of whatís going on...

The colour thatís still getting through the tint tells a remarkable story in and of itself...magenta.

A studious type, will note where magenta lies on the UV spectrum.

Thereís also zero EMF, nor are there any toxic or dangerous emissions.

No x-ray, no gamma, nothing whatsoever, just a perfectly clean plug which is doing things nobody believed were possible at that time.

Anyone with electrical knowledge will be aware that a high energy radiant plasma is essentially a mini sun, and like the sun, is round.

Note the plasma ejection, itís shaped like a candle flame.

Show that to a physicist and watch his mind snap.

He will know that a high energy radiant plasma is as hot as the sun, and heíll know that nothing can survive those kinds of temperatures. Itíll vaporise diamond and melt tungsten, the hardest propertyís known to man.

So how does one design a spark plug thatís going to survive?

Itíll just get melted and consumed as fuel in an instant...

Truth is, I fluked it.

I knew I couldnít use thoriated tungsten as that becomes radioactive when subjected to moderate current flows, so what did I use?

How to model the plasma away from the orb shape and into a bullet shape?

How can it eject the plasma without melting or eating the plug materials?

Pot luck is how...

You get pure tungsten but it cannot be machined, only cut.

I had a mob in USA develop me some pure tungsten rings and cylindrical rods which when assembled, resembled a surface discharge spark plug, like a Kawasaki Z900 plug, or a marine outboard plug, but thatís where the similarity ends.

The equidistant gap and deep well extending into the plug base, creates an interesting little phenomenon as the deep well acts as a fuel tank for ionised fuel.
It ionises whatever you feed it, to the atomic level, instantly, then detonates the atomic hydrogen, which blows the plasma out of the plug without it ever touching the plug components, just like that.

You couldnít design it to do that even if you tried, you can only arse it, and I mean, totally arse it.

I had the plugs built and shipped to the project in Italy untested.

The engineers freaked and I mean freaked.

They reckoned I scammed them...for nobody operates that way in the scientific world but thatís what happened.

They asked what I expected the outcome would be the moment they fired it up and I simply stated that it was a 50/50 situation, purely, my plug design would either work brilliantly or it would vaporise, it can only be one way or the other.

It was a very tense time...

Next thing, theyíve set it up to test it and boom...it worked...and now they canít find the words to describe what theyíre seeing.

Their minds couldnít comprehend it.

I just roared laughing because after the tension came the release and watching their reactions and facial expressions was too much for me and I lost it totally.
Without a doubt, my laughter was driven by fear, because theyíd already told me that they were going to basically skin me alive then eat me, for they were certain that failure was imminent, then bingo, they hit the button and the rest is history.

Anyhow, the success of the plug ended up being the cause of the failure of that element of that project, because the custom built supercharged radial engine was air cooled, no coolant or water at all, and after running on bottled hydrogen for 7 glorious minutes, the engine was shut down and disassembled for inspection, whereupon it was discovered to be filled with water...

They couldnít understand it and all eyes were on me to figure it out, because it ran perfectly with a standard ignition, but on plasma it somehow created water within the crank case...why?

A quick head scratch and trying to get over the thrill and the laughter of the preceding minutes and itís full blown thinking time.

How?
Why?

Of note was the report/sound it made when it was fired in open air prior to it being installed in the engine, sounded really loud, like a bull whip cracking, or a rifle cartridge being fired.

Being a former explosives preloader and having a reasonable grasp of sound travel through my occupation as a Marine Seismic Navigator, and having had a lifelong familiarity with firearms etc, I knew that thesound/report was not only unanticipated, but was significantly powerful and remarkably fast.

We had audio as everything was being recorded, so a quick rewind and replay presented another quest, find out what was making the rifle shot sound and figure out how it was creating water out of thin air.

Using my knowledge of guns, I estimated the sound to be travelling above 1000 fps, and playing the sound back through a computer program which timed it, the result was 1.222222222 fps, energy unknown.

How to figure this out?

To cut a long story short, the answer is:

The high energy radiant plasma, fired through the Nascent Plug, ionised whatever it was fed to the atomic level and detonated the atomic hydrogen, which projected the plasma out into the combustion chambers, in turn detonating and generally vaporising the bottled hydrogen.

Due to the ionised hydrogen atoms being stripped of electrons, theyíre looking for an electron so as to reassemble and because theyíre so powerful, like about 7-10 times more powerful than ordinary hydrogen atoms, they steal the first electron they come across, which from memory (faded now) I think may have been the oxygen atom, something like that.

H2O, water...

Howís it getting into the crank case?

Simple, via the bore hatch and piston rings.

It cannot be compressed as itís at the atomic level thus has no body to compress, therefore under the slightest pressure, it just makes for the nearest exit, perhaps a mere microscopic scratch and theyíre gone.

They donít get far, just far enough to grab a mate and reassemble as water...

Engineers and scientists are peculiar creatures, for they never stop searching for another approach.

Rather than backtrack by ditching my spark plug, which clearly isnít suitable in a radial engine, they pressed forward using atomic hydrogen stored in metal hydride, on a 50cc scooter.

The metal hydride fuel cell was the size of a Red Bull can, is solid steel and is inert in every way, even when loaded with atomic hydrogen.

Pretty amazing project, the math was crazy.

The figures I saw, predicted that the 50cc mini bike could theoretically travel from Melbourne to Perth and back to Ceduna before it required a replacement fuel cell, again, Red Bull can size.

The project collapsed because the engineers lost the plot trying to remedy the water in the crank case problem.

They started a spin off project and I got dragged off into that, but to be totally honest, I wasnít very helpful as it was far too technical for me.

They hypothesised that if they ionised nitrogen, reversing its polarity, the rampaging atomic hydrogen atom would lock onto that, which cancels the H2O business and due to the larger sized atoms, albeit reduced in stored energy yield potential, down from like 7-10 times as powerful as an ordinary hydrogen atom, is brought down to 2-3 times.
They argued that it was still viable.
That meant the mini bike would only make it from say Melbourne to about Port Augusta before requiring a refuel.

They pressed on and on, overcoming hurdle after hurdle till the investors pulled the pin, like more than 12 months later.

I bailed long before that and wasnít able to recover my property or get paid.

It was all a waste of time and money.

That project led me to the later one, up in Qld, where an R&D company approached me to assist them in several big projects, which were all very interesting but as I said earlier, the automotive/racing/fuel economy/emissions reduction one was the easiest, so away that went, and boom, 10 days from launch, I walked out.

Canít turn back the clock and time doesnít stop.

Iíll never get involved with R&D projects ever again.

You can only be burned so many times before you tire of it.

That said, it was interesting and took up a fair bit of time.

Iím getting old now and am struggling health wise. I nearly died in 2017 from blood poisoning, caused by what they think was a cyst on the bone in my upper jaw, that cost me all my teeth and near did me in, but for some unknown reason I survived, though itís been a massive struggle to recover my health.

Age catches up with all of us sooner or later and the older we get, the more our chemistry changes, defeating us this way and that till we finally check out.

I canít believe Iím writing all this stuff for I should have been asleep several hours ago.
They started me on some new medication today, because the health took another broadside and Iím a bit uncertain how itís going to go, but oh well, only one way to find out.
I gotta try to force myself to sleep, this new medication isnít good.
Itís supposed to knock you out, not hype you up...

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #117 on: October 10, 2019, 09:33:16 PM »
A fantastic read, I get about 1%.
 99% is way over my head and hitting the wall behind me. Alternative fuels and plasma!

Off topic, but here in Canberra there are a few electric cars. So much R&D for the things. And there is the electric Lightweight Land Rover out Murrumbatemen way.

What are your thoughts on the future, the electric fleet? I don't like that big brother or even your insurance company could remotely disable the vehicle using the computer network. If the vehicles are hired, not owned, that would be different.

We are fortunate to have lived in the age of relatively simple and private motoring.

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #118 on: October 12, 2019, 11:05:02 AM »
My thoughts?

My initial thought when seeing what Iíd written made me cringe, for I have scant memory of writing it.
The loosening of my tongue came from a new heavy duty medication I commenced using the night I wrote all that stuff, and while it did the exact opposite of what it was supposed to do, the following couple of days were difficult and I was very doubtful of finding relief, but I awoke this morning feeling bloody marvellous for the first time in probably 3 years.
This doctor took a punt and I think sheís on the right track.

Fingers crossed.


My thoughts of the future?
Technologically speaking, progress is being made in leaps and bounds in many areas but the powers that be are still holding on (only just) with their petrodollar driven agendas.
The global economy being held up now by false hope alone, it appears a change is coming and the reliance on fossil  fuels can only be addressed after a global financial reset.

A careful observer will already note that uncle sam (yes, lower case) is pulling out of its wicked ways, such that lies and oil/gas will no longer drive the war machine and soldiers will no longer be lied to and forced into perilous situations at the behest of some treasonous low life political grub whoís only earning a couple of hundred thousand a year by being a scumbag public servant yet amasses millions in reality, totally unchecked and accountable to nobody...

Only an idiot would believe that servicemen went into any other country for any other reason than for the forced acquisition of the target countries assets, full stop.

Iíd like an electric car, why not. Iím all for the environment and critters.
On the other hand, I still like nicely configured conventionally fuelled vehicles for thatís what I grew up on, so while I donít mind flying the flag for that camp, Iíll still fly one for the other, but saying that, if I had to choose, Iíd probably go electric.

You can already see that itís all heading in that direction by the way itís getting difficult to source bits and pieces for the older chariots.

Look at the prices...

Not so long ago, you could get the parts you needed everywhere with ease, and they were so plentiful that you could almost get them at your local fish and chip shop, but those days are gone now, well and truly.

In days of old, kids grew up observing how their old man and uncles etc, tinkered and tweaked with the family jalopy, and in turn grew accustomed to repairing them themselves and that sometimes drew them into the automotive repair game which prospered. These days you canít get a kid to do anything unless itís got a screen and a cyber game to keep the little cherub from being bored.

Iíve no clue as per how it will all turn out but I do believe we were born in the best era of human evolution for weíve seen so much progress in such a short time, more than in any other era.

My hope is to live long enough to see a global financial reset, and after the chaos and carnage of that, to sit back and observe how much progress that would elicit.

The era of digging massive holes in the ground and hocking the minerals off to foreign industrial and marketing giants cannot be sustained indefinitely.

This modern digital age is a tricky one, thatís for sure, but kids are all over it at the youngest of ages, so while we grew up playing outside with sticks and stones and ants etc, the new age nippers wouldnít know what an ant was, and would perish in a heartbeat if the power grid ever collapses and stops them recharging their phones and devices, but alas, thatís what a heaped dose of progress will get ya...

Youíre living in the heart of the deceptive beast, and right next door to where all the digital wickedness is being done (Majura).
The problem is far greater than you could possibly ever imagine and itís folly to attempt to digest it all.

Sorry if my opinion causes a crinkly brow but I prefer to just say it as I see it and truth is a blunt instrument these days.

Subject change...

Last night I shifted the 109 and even though itís fully loaded with parts, the wheelspin was a bit hectic, such that I felt the Detroit Locker wasnít working.
A few tries both forward and backwards on gravel and nope, not working.
The right wheel is working but nothing at all from the left back wheel.
Iím thinking itís either the locker itself or an axle or drive flange, probably in reverse order.

Itís a pity the weather is so ordinary this weekend, for the way this medication is working, I feel like I could do just about anything.
If the doctor has finally found the problem and solved it, Iíll be happy to kiss her backside.
My missus freaked out because sheís never seen me jump out of bed and hit the ground running for years.
Itís still early days of course but Iím feeling pretty darn good right now.
If I continue to feel ok, then Iíll be doing some big time work on my 109.
I got some ideas I wouldnít mind trying.

Hard to find info on 109ís these days as everyone seems to have gone in for the effeminate Defender model...

Whatís the world coming to?

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Re: Is there a place here for modified ex army Land Rovers?
« Reply #119 on: October 12, 2019, 11:39:53 AM »
Carzee, this one just popped up on one of my feeds and I thought it was pretty interesting, given our conversation here.

https://youtu.be/FwzmQf44hMo