Author Topic: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck  (Read 71341 times)

Offline john.k

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #330 on: October 01, 2019, 09:40:18 PM »
Good work on the truck.......you shouldnt have trouble with parts for the motor............Kubotas are complicated by all the grey.imports...if you mention any serial no  of a grey import ,you get cut off straight away......they dont like them.....When I was at the sandblasters,we had the same motor on a home made waterblast cleaner......it worked quite well,but starting ...well ,the thing would rip yer bl**dy arm off......Commonest parts they need would be float valve for the carby,and the fuel tap is often attacked by alcohol......never use alcohol E10 fuel......truck too.....the stuff dissolves some alloys used in older fuel pumps and carbys.

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #331 on: October 03, 2019, 09:41:46 AM »
I got a quote back from the Shelter Station place in Molendinar, QLD. Down near Surfers Paradise. The RV Shelter is usually $2800, but are currently on special for $2200. The problem is that they got a quote from Toll and they want $800 to ship it down to the depot in Devonport, where I have to collect it from. A truck wouldn't get into the paddock near where I will be assembling it anyway.

Does anyone have an contacts in the transport industry, or know of a company I could contact for a cheaper quote?
The steel crate it ships in is 2.8m long, 70cm wide, 70cm high and weight 430kg.



It's 8m long by 4m wide and high. 5 year warranty on the cover.

Greg.

Offline STDDIVER

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #332 on: October 03, 2019, 03:19:18 PM »
Hi Greg - Same problem - slightly different solution.  I purchased a couple of the domes and attached them to 40' containers.  Gives room enough to work and by cutting a hatch in the side of the container a nearby store and workshop.  This project is nearly finished and I am looking forwards to getting all of the vehicles under cover as soon as I can (Annual Camp etc getting in the way).  PM me and I may be able to assist with an extra cover at a very reasonable price or point you in the right direction to save lots of $.  Love your work and I learn heaps every time you tackle a new part of your project.  I have some inter TAC signs for you too!  Cheers mate

STDDIVER

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #333 on: October 03, 2019, 04:29:36 PM »
Thanks for that. PM sent.

Well, I rang around the local freight places. TNT wanted $1260.  :o
There's a local company here called Tasfreight. Turns out they have depots in most capital cities. They quoted me $500 ex GST, so that is who I will go with if I get approval from the landlord and the council has no issues. Should be ok, as it wouldn't be considered a permanent structure.

I built my rail press yesterday and had a go with it this morning.



In some places I have the jack on top of the rail, but mostly it sits underneath, as in the pic. I spread the pressure out by placing a piece of 1/2" thick flat bar on top of the jack ram and also between the top strap and the rail. These pieces are 2" long, as I found if I go longer, they tend to bend instead of squeezing the rails in. I also cut a section of thick walled pipe to fit inside the chassis rail. This stops the press squeezing the inner rail in.



I was surprised at how easy it was to squeeze them up. It is an 8 tonne jack though. As you can see in the pic, I have to go back over a few places and give them another squeeze, but I don't think I am going to have to weld anywhere near as much as I originally expected.

Greg.

Offline STDDIVER

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #334 on: October 03, 2019, 07:30:03 PM »
Great work Greg - Learning alot from you!

STDDIVER   

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #335 on: October 04, 2019, 08:24:15 AM »
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Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #336 on: December 08, 2019, 03:29:10 PM »
Well, I got a call last Friday that my crate had arrived. It was a public holiday and the couple of people I know with large trailers were all off on a long weekend holiday, or wouldn't answer their phones, so I had to hire a car trailer.
The crate is 3m long, 70cm wide and 45cm high, weighing 417kg. It was really solid, being made of light weight angle iron and some sort of expanded mesh.
The guy at the freight company rested the end on the back of the trailer, then picked up the far end and just slid it up the deck. It had sections of 3" pipe welded to the bottom to act as feet/skids.



The next issue was getting it off. The neighbour had cut down all the dead gums along our fenceline, so I couldn't tie it to one of them and drive off. I thought of hooking the work ute to it and pulling it, but figured the jolt when it dropped off the trailer might set off the airbags.
Eventually, I decided to just hook it to the D rings on the front bumper of the truck. I have tightened up all of the brake adjusters on the wheels to lock it in place, as with the transfer case out, I can't use the handbrake as the linkage is part of the transfer case crossmember.
I do have a ratchet strap hooked from the handbrake pivot arm on the back to the intermediate axle, but was still a bit worried it might roll away. The wheels are all chocked to stop it rolling down the paddock towards the house and main road, but I was worried it would roll forward when I dragged the crate off, and then trundle off backwards. I used a couple of pine sleepers to chock the front wheels, but probably needn't have bothered. It didn't even twitch.



With that on the ground, I dropped the trailer back and came home and gave the neighbour a hand for the rest of the day, cutting up all the dead gums he had dropped. It was perfect timing, as I no longer have to worry about them dropping branches on the truck or our fence.
The following day, and every day for the following week, the weather blew it's guts out. I think we had guts over 70km/h every day, with a couple of days where it topped 100km/h.
A block of units and 2 houses in town lost their roofs, but everything survived at my place.

Today is the first day with only light 15 to 20km/h winds. Nice and sunny. I got to open the box and lay everything out.



That was probably a mistake. Everything heated up and became a pain to handle. The frame is galvanised steel pipe, and where the ends were swaged down so they fitted into the other section, they seem to have been painted with something like Silverfrost. Whatever it was, it softened in the heat and got all over me. Although the frame will be under cover, I'm thinking it might be a good idea to paint it before putting it up. I have a full 4L drum of Zinc Epoxy, which should protect it for years. If I coat it with that, then a topcoat of some good UV resistant paint, I should never have to touch it again. Its more work, but I think its going to be a lot easier to do it now, rather than trying to touch it up later when it rusts.



I put some of the frames together so I can get an idea on the width and length. Its 4m wide so I have to decide whether I want even spacing up the sides, or more on one side or the other. I'm thinking that for now, it might be worth ignoring the truck alignment and make it square to the tray, which is behind it up on drums. Once the transfer case is back in the truck, I can drive it around and repark it anywhere in the shed, depending what I need to work on. If its square to the tray, I can unlace the shed ends and back right through and under the tray, to remount it.
I have to call into Bunnings to get some cheap timber and stringline to make profiles. Its going to be tricky as I can't measure the diagonals. Someone parked a truck in the way. I also have the transfer case sitting on a stack of spare tires, right where one of the frames sits. I'll have to wait until someone calls in and get them to give me a hand to lift it up onto the back of the truck. I could use the Abbey crane, but I wanted to do a service on the engine before running it for long. 

I originally intended to use the "ground anchors" they ship it with to hold the foot plates down. These are a length of threaded rod with a spiral of metal wrapped around them that you screw down into the ground. After seeing how strong the winds get out here, I think I am better off putting in concrete footing pads. I can embed a loop of rebar in each one and later use it to pop the block out of the ground if I ever move the shed. Anyone have any idea how big I should make the pads? I was thinking 300x300, maybe 450 deep. I'll have to make a visit to the scrap metal place and see if I can find any threaded rod or thick rebar that I could use to secure the base plates to the pads.

Anyway, I'll post more when I get some work done.
Thanks for reading.

Greg.

Offline GGG

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #337 on: December 08, 2019, 08:16:42 PM »
Greg, Like most of us you are completely out of your mind but I love your work! You are bringing back a lot of great memories of my short time in Service Corps driving Internationals.
Geoff O.

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #338 on: December 09, 2019, 08:49:57 AM »
I would dig a footing 600mm deep.

If you have gravelly soil, mix cement into the spoil and ram it back into the holes; that method worked superbly for my hay shed,

Cheers Charlie
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Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #339 on: December 09, 2019, 01:12:08 PM »
Thanks for that.
Out in the back paddock, its mostly a mixture of old blown sand from the coast and greasy yellow clay. The clay forms a pan under the whole area, but goes from being over a metre down, to just under the surface.
Turns out my sister's partner runs the engineering section of the neighbouring council, and she is going to drag him over to have a look after work one evening.
It will be interesting to see what he says the local regs require, not that I'm going to follow them if they seem ridiculous. :)

Greg.

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #340 on: December 29, 2019, 07:49:54 PM »
Ok, just a minor update.
He took one look at the "earth anchors" and just laughed. Pretty much my reaction, too.
After doing some calculations using the height, width, placement angle and predominant wind direction, he worked out that 50kg per leg would be sufficient. He thought I was going to pour a block and attach it to the legs, above ground. When I said I was thinking in-ground concrete pads, he said 300x300x300 would be more than enough.
I picked up some foundation bolts from Bunnings and have drilled appropriate holes in the foot plates for them. These are just a L shaped 12mm steel rod with thread on the top that you concrete in. Dynabolts would likely split the concrete pad.
Next job was to start the truck and use the crane to move the transfer case from where it was sitting, right where one of the foot plates would go.
With the battery all charged up, I pumped some fuel up from the boat tank until the glass bowl was full and hit the button. It spun over really well and fired and ran at the 18 second mark. Once it warmed up a bit, I set the idle by slipping a thin plastic wedge under the linkage on the carb and engaged the PTO pump. The tappets are a bit rattly, but I want to do a full oil flush and filter change before I pull the tappet cover off to adjust them and fit a new, non-leaking gasket.
Trying to remember the order I needed to unlimber the crane from its parked position was interesting. I used to have it written on a bit of paper, but it got wet and fell apart. I have both the original and new metal plaques that explain it, but they are filed away somewhere safe until I restore the cab.
I got the crane unfurled and had to extend the final jib to reach the transfer case. It usually loads up the engine a bit, but this time it really struggled and almost stalled the engine. Anyway, I got it hooked up and swung the transfer case up onto some sleepers on the chassis rails where it is sure to be in the way shortly. I folded the crane up and stowed it away. Once again, the final jib was really struggling to retract. I had checked the ram when it was extended and there was no rust, leaks or scratches. I was thinking it might be sticking valves or maybe a hose collapsing internally.



The next morning when I came out, I found this. Oil was leaking down the main column. I thought the seal in the end of the main ram must have leaked, as I originally found some surface rust on it when I got the truck that probably formed when the ram was low on oil and there was an air space at that end. On closer inspection, I realised that one of the hoses was leaking. The back of it, where it was against the boom, was all torn up and showing the wire braided lining. Following it and the other hose down, I found several other places where it was chewed up. I checked the other hoses that go to the other rams and found similar damage. From what I can see, I think the hoses weren't run correctly or the operator wasn't watching the slack in them and caught them when opening and closing the crane. A few weeks back I noticed what I thought was a leak from the seal on the second ram, which I now realise was from one of the hoses.
I wiped the 2 down that go from the spool assembly to the final jib with some petrol on a rag and found that any time I flexed them, even slightly, they made crackling noises. As you can see in the pic below, the rubber coating is totally perished and cracking.



One of my contractors runs a lot of excavator-based harvesters, skidders and forwarders. He got sick of waiting for mobile hose mechanics all the time and bought his own machine that is in one of his service trucks. I'm going to take one of the hoses to him tomorrow and see if he can make me some replacements. It will be a lot cheaper than going through the local hydraulics places. The only issue will be the fittings. From what I can work out, they are all JIC fittings. I don't know if this is common or not, as I had a lot of issues trying to get the correct flare nuts for the steel air lines. The descriptions for them all had 45 seats. Hopefully, JIC is more common.



Typically, even removing the hose went wrong. I had a spanner on the hose and another on the nut/fitting you can see with the small copper pipes attached to it, but I wasn't careful enough and and the fitting rotated; only a tiny amount, but enough that the old brittle copper pipe split. I pulled it off, thinking it would use a flare fitting like brake line, but no, it has an odd little square edged olive that swages down onto the pipe, sealing it between the nut and the main nipple. The RPS calls the pipe, nuts and olive a "tube assembly, metal (with 2 connector nuts and 2 compression sleeves)". Hopefully one of the local places will be open tomorrow and have a solution.



The good news is that from what I can see, the fittings are mostly BSP threads. If I had to, I could either change the elbows to flare fittings or just screw in a BSP to flare nipple. The original pipes are copper, but I would think I could use steel brake line and put a double flare on the ends and just screw standard brake fitting nipples into numbers 2 and 20 on the diagram. This might actually be a better idea, as the fittings currently in use really swaged the copper pipe down, restricting any flow.

Anyway, now that I had broken stuff and gotten covered in clean hydraulic oil and old dirty grease, I finally got to lay out the string lines for the shed footings.



This took a lot of thinking. I did pre-vocational carpentry at TAFE back in about 1987 and haven't had to lay out profiles since. Luckily I was able to remember the trig formula for finding the length of the hypotenuse when you know 2 sides and have a right angle. There were only 2 spots where I could measure 4x4m without hitting a wheel when measuring the diagonal, and I was only out by about 10cm. With the 2 long sides parallel, and the top squared off at 90, we just measured down 8m on both sides and adjusted the string line to suit. 

I used a water level to check the fall and roll off. From top (right) to bottom, it drops 580mm over the 8m. From top (left) to bottom, it drops 485mm. From (top) right to left, it drops 185mm and from (bottom) right to left it drops 75mm.
This had me scratching my head for a bit, until I realised that if I scraped 100m off the top right corner, the drop from top to bottom on both sides would be within 5mm and the same with the slope from right to left.

That's where I am at so far. I have to work tomorrow, but then have the rest of the week off. I should get the holes dug over the next few days, if its not too hot and the little black flies don't carry me off. After that, its just a matter of getting a scoop of builders mix in the trailer, a few bags of cement and mixing up some footings. I plan to pour them, then put the foundation bolts through the foot plates and push them into the wet concrete. This way I can get the plates positioned exactly where I want them. I can wire a couple of bits of pine across the top of each plate to stop it sinking in until the concrete hardens.
From there, it should go up fast.

I'll post more once the concreting is done, or if I break something else.

Greg.

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #341 on: December 30, 2019, 09:55:03 AM »
Sounds like my place new jobs springing up all over the show.

An easy formula for remembering Pythagoras's theorem is; A squared + B squared = C squared; where C is the hypotenuse.

Cheers Charlie
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Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #342 on: March 27, 2020, 04:46:07 PM »
Shed's up.  ;D

Got the new cover last Friday, direct from the factory (in China). Heard a thump out the front and thought a passing car had hit a wallaby or something. Looked outside and saw a van in the front yard.
I opened the front door to see what was going on, just in time to see him drive off.



I got a hand during the week to get it out and dragged over the frame. We tensioned off the ends and left it a few days to settle and stretch. Today I re tensioned the ends and evened it up, then we hung the end covers. The main cover uses a choke rope on each end, sort of like the old covered wagons in Little House on the Prairie, and also has an internal strip with eyelets to run a rope through and around the end frames to lash it up tight. The ends are held on with just a loop of elastic cord with a knob on the end. You poke the cord through the eyelet in the end tarp, loop it around the frame and hook it over the knob on the end. I don't like the system. The end pieces are fairly heavy and flap in the breeze. I see the elastic cord failing and then the whole end blowing in. I think I will buy some rope and lash it to the end frames. Its not like I'll be taking it down often.

 

The ends look dirty, because they are. They were rolled op out in the yard and one was laying on the metal frame of the box it was all shipped in. Untreated steel, so its rust. It should fade, or I'll work out a way to clean it. The material is like the old truck tarps. Some sort of fabric reinforced PVC. I recall using Oxalic Acid to remove rust stains from fibreglass on one of the fishing boats I used to work on. I'll have to look it up and see if it is safe for PVC.

I will leave the shed for a few days, now that it is all tensioned, and then I have to fit the ratchet straps inside that pull the sides down tight and evenly. It should get a bit of sun on it over the next few days, so I'll see if there is any more stretching. I know it was pretty warm in there once we closed both ends up. The next thing to do is get a few LED light battens and get them set up. I'm going to run a couple of extension leads along the ridge, dropping down over the truck, so I don't have to keep climbing down to change tools.

While its still warm, I'll put 2 top coats of olive drab on the chassis rails and cross-members. Then I can refit the steel plates and rollers for the winch fair lead system. The bottom one is all cleaned, epoxy coated and primed. Will top coat it and refit with all new bolts. The top plate was seriously bent from when they pulled the winch cable in too far. I still need to heat it up with the LPG torch and try to straighten it with the press.
With that painted and back on, I can refit the air valve safety thing at the back and run new air lines to the trailer valves. Then replace all the old rusted out air lines with Brake-Safe rated pipe and fittings. I'm not going to stuff around with trying to make new steel ones. I'd need all new end fittings, it's difficult to get the bends right and if I don't get it exactly right, the mounting clips won't fit. The local truck place that do the engineering inspections for rego explained what I needed to use instead of steel to pass when I go for my certificate.

I've been working on some of the smaller bits while waiting for the shed cover, but I have to sort out my pics and get them all uploaded. I'll post a bit more once that is done.

Greg.

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #343 on: March 28, 2020, 09:45:57 AM »
Well done!

Nice to see that you are making progress,

Cheers Charlie
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