Author Topic: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck  (Read 19420 times)

Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #240 on: November 04, 2017, 06:08:37 PM »
Bit of progress.
I have the new bearings and seals fitted into the winch housing. The brake box is back on and the chain drive partly done.
I just have to make a new shear pin for the top sprocket from a socket head 1/2" UNF bolt.  Once that's done, I can refit the sprocket, chain and outer cover.



I'll give the whole thing another coat of paint before it goes back in. It's getting a lot heavier as it goes back together and I've managed to get a few scratches in the new paint.

This afternoon I started working on cleaning up the end frame and side rails. Lots of wire wheeling and painting needed there.
I managed to get the air actuator off the side frame after struggling with it for an hour. No idea why they used clevis pins instead of smooth shanked bolts for the ram to mount with. You can't get to the back to drive the pin out when it rusts in and the head is round and smooth so you can't grip it to pull it out.



Before and after shots. Looks like the 6x6 trucks got the upgraded actuator with the brass cylinder. The MK3 has the steel version.
I'll pull it apart and give it all a good clean and paint when I get home tomorrow.

It's good to see bits going back together. I have a lot of work to do on the truck before the winch goes back in though.

Greg.

Offline john.k

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #241 on: November 04, 2017, 07:07:31 PM »
You can drill hardened steel with masonry drills.Just pick one with clearance angles like a drillbit,rather then the rounded edge types.The other way is to spot anneal the hard area with oxy. and cool slowly.

Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #242 on: November 05, 2017, 09:31:20 PM »
...
Would getting a seal with the diameter of 3.006" really make much of a difference over the 3.0002" seal? What do you all suggest? One of the guys at work thought that the small difference in diameter probably wouldn't be enough and said to get some Loctite Bearing and Shaft Retainer.

...
There's a lot of technical know-how and skill going to be lost when he passes, and I don't think people coming up through the engineering fields these days will compare.
...
Greg.

Nice work Greg!

According to the online converter 0.004" equals 0.1016mm. Loctite 641 is recommended for parts that will need subsequent dismantling and it has a maximum gap filling capability of 0.2mm, so it should meet your needs. However, there is a bit more to it than that, as the seal must be concentric to the shaft; if you need more information let me know and I can send you a scan from the Loctite "Do it right users' guide."

I suspect the old boy is a fitter, not an engineer and thankfully fitters still get trained in this country, but what they get shown is a bit of an unknown to me. I was trained as a fitter in the Army Reserve,

Cheers Charlie

P.S. Wives, daughters and mothers doing everything they can to keep a bloke out of the shed when he gets frail or has been ill, is a common thing. They mean well, but occupational therapy is very good for mental health and I suspect that you did a world of good for the old boy, although they can usually only take small doses of it.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 09:31:58 AM by Chazza »
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Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #243 on: November 06, 2017, 11:10:24 AM »
Thanks for that.

I forgot to mention in the last post that I took the seal and the chain drive housing into a different bearing place and they had a really big set of verniers that could measure the seal housing, even with the shaft fitted.
The housing measured 3.006", with a tiny variance at a few places. They measured the seal and it turns out it is out of round. It measured 3.002" to 3.004". The guy says it happens occasionally, but should have been rejected in the QA process.
He went through his collection of 3.006" seals and measured them all to get one that was just slightly over sized at 3.008". $9.80. Problem solved.

Greg.

Offline STDDIVER

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #244 on: November 07, 2017, 12:21:43 PM »
Greg, Charlie and John- the fonts of knowledge in this post are amazing!   Congrats on an excellent stream and topics!  I learn about mental health, engineering and 6x6 AACOs   ;)

Frank





Offline Chazza

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #245 on: November 08, 2017, 08:49:59 AM »
... No idea why they used clevis pins instead of smooth shanked bolts for the ram to mount with. You can't get to the back to drive the pin out when it rusts in and the head is round and smooth so you can't grip it to pull it out.
...
Greg.
Coat them liberally with Loctite Anti-Seize and they will come out next time  :D
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Offline Ravvin

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Re: 180-971 F1 Crane Truck
« Reply #246 on: November 20, 2017, 08:43:55 PM »
Hi all. Been getting almost nothing done lately. Got a rental inspection this Wednesday, so been cleaning and mowing. Then mowing some more.
I think I've been here 8 years and I've never seen it this bad. If I don't mow around the trucks every weekend, the grass is too thick and just chokes the mower.

About all I have gotten done lately is the winch air ram. When I got it apart, I found that the main piston rubber was marked PBR PC646-3. That's different to what's in the RPS, but the local places still don't have a listing. Luckily, mine was in good condition.
Before I got it apart, I couldn't even pull the piston out. Once I got the gland nut on the end off, I found that there is a rubber grommet that gets squashed down to seal on the shaft. Almost like the system to stop water squirting out the shaft on a household tap. New taps use an o'ring, but older taps used a gland seal made from a twist of greased hemp fibre.
I dug the grommet out and found that they actually had 3 in there. The top one looked ok, but the 2 under it were really old, hard and brittle. I think they just stuck a new one on top and tightened it up. I tossed the 2 older ones out and cut a couple of new disks out of some soft insertion rubber sheet. I used my wad punches to cut the centres out and used one size smaller than the shaft. The proper grommets are oval in cross-section, which aligns with a groove in the bottom of the gland nut. I coated my new rubber disks with some rubber grease and put them in first, then put the original grommet on top and did the gland nut up enough to almost stop the shaft being pulled out by hand.

I etch primed all the parts and later gave them a good top coat. I reassembled it with new bolts and just need to give it a light respray to cover a few scratches.
Oh, I carefully cut a couple of thin insertion rubber rings out to seal the barrel ends. The originals were thin resin sort of things and leaked air. If I really hunted around, I could possibly find a square section o'ring the right size, but this seems to have worked.
I haven't tested it with pressurised air yet, but I can cover the hole and push the rod in and it holds the air until my thumb gives out. Same on the other end when I pull the shaft out.



Only had the little compact camera handy. Neither of those pics looks right. The dark one was without the flash.
I just realised that I have to get a couple of new flexible hoses made up to connect to the ram. The old ones have become rock hard. The steel pipes seem ok though, so I just need to get the fittings undone without twisting the flared ends off.

Once I get this inspection over with, I can get stuck into cleaning up the chassis rails and replacing the rusted out air pipes. And make new brake pipes. Then refit the master cylinders.

I had to order in a replacement switch for the Gernie steam cleaner. The previous owner broke the shaft off and was using a screwdriver to turn it on and adjust the heat. He finally chewed the hole out to the point where it wouldn't switch on. He's lucky he didn't electrocute himself. It would cough a couple a puffs of smoke and that's it.
I played around with the burner partly dismantled and saw that there was plenty or ignition spark, but only a tiny dribble of diesel from the tip. It should be a continuous cone shaped fine spray. I was looking at this dribble when I spotted sediment in the return line that takes excess fuel back to the low pressure side of the pump.
The previous owner had replaced the main fuel hose from the tank to the injector pump, and didn't bother putting the filter back in the line. The diesel tank has a strainer in the filler hole, but it was almost clogged totally. The tank had about 2 litres of fuel in it and it was full of dirt and sludge. I cleaned it out and refilled it, but it looks like some had gotten through the pump and partly blocked the solenoid to injector passage.
I replaced all the rest of the fuel lines after cleaning the tank, but need to fit a new filter, dismantle the injector and solenoid and clean them. Should be a ripper when it gets going. 

Will post more when I get something done.

Greg.