Author Topic: Inter 170-952  (Read 48255 times)

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #90 on: April 27, 2015, 09:57:15 AM »
Warning, Wall of Text incoming.
It's Monday morning and I'm bored at work, wishing I could go home and play with my truck.

Thanks for that link Charlie. There is a local specialist auto store in town who sell magnetic drain plugs at a very reasonable price. The magnet idea would probably be cheaper, but I have to replace my plug anyway as it is very burred and I only got it off by jamming a smaller metric socket onto it.
Geoff, I think something happened to your post.

Tim, I have been using one of the Supercheap sandblasting guns, but not the hopper type. Mine has a rubber hose that you put in the bucket of sand. I found that it had many issues and I had to keep the bucket on about the same level as the gun and even then, I had to shorten the hose so it would pull the grit through. The more I used it, the worse it got. I was only getting grit come through in spits and spurts. I bought some clear hose, got a 2L softdrink bottle, made a hole in the cap to put the end through, then pushed a 15mm length of 3/8" air line pipe into it so it couldn't pull out. I made a hole in the other end of the bottle to poke a funnel in so I could refill it and made a handle to hang it up so it was higher than the gun. It works better than the original setup, but still has issues. I originally got the hose type gun over the canister type as I thought it would be easier to get into tight spaces. I might try a canister type though.

I have found that using a coarse twisted wire cup wheel on a grinder is much faster than sandblasting for heavily painted surfaces. If there is heavy rust or pitting, I use one of those flappy wheel things on the grinder. They are only $7 and last ages. For small things and light rust or paint, I use one of the fine wire cup wheels on the grinder. When I clean the brass fittings and the little fiddly bits, I usually get what I can with the fine wire cup wheel, then sandblast the rest. I also use the sandblaster to finish off tight corners and areas that I can't get the grinder into.

Three things I should mention. First, I always wear both safety glasses and a full face shield when sand blasting or using the wire wheel. I found that the grit tended to get behind the glasses or the shield if I only used one. That grit is designed to be very abrasive and is really bad on the eyes. Second, I found that the little wires on those cup brushes come loose a lot. They go right through a pair of overalls. After working with the grinder one day, I had a shower and when drying off, something kept catching on the towel. I found a tiny bit of wire poking out of my stomach, only about 3mm long. I couldn't pull it out. I finally got hold with tweezers and pulled a piece out that measured 19mm, by my verniers. Luckily, I'm well padded in that area, so no lasting damage was done, but that could have been very bad. Now, any time I use the grinder with the wire cup wheels, I wear a leather apron that I made out of an old kangaroo hide. They don't seem to make it through that. Finally, I found out years ago that using beach sand for sand blasting is a bad idea. I had 2 steel scuba tanks that were very rough. I sandblasted them using beach sand that I washed and dried. It did a great job stripping them back to bare metal, and then I painted them using a 2 pack epoxy paint that was used on industrial pipelines that sit out in the open. They looked great. Within 6 months, both cylinders were covered with tiny pinhead sized blisters. When sanded, each blister covered a tiny pocket of white corrosion. When I showed my boss, he explained that it was from using beach sand. The sandblasting forced tiny bits of salt from the sand particles into the pores of the steel. He said if I was going to use sand, to use sharp river sand. It isnít as fine as beach sand, but it wouldnít have salt in it.
I get my grit from a local industrial supply place and it comes in 30kg bags for $20. Itís available in different grades and the stuff I have is red and is a garnet grit. It works way better than the black stuff in the 10kg tubs that Supercheap sell.

All I did with the generator was to replace the wires that had melted together and then burnt out. I was pretty surprised that the thing still worked. For now, I will leave it in. Interestingly, while many pics I have seen of MK3ís show them with a generator, the MK4 Repair Parts Scale papers and the MK3 Workshop manual show them as having alternators. These alternators were still externally regulated, so they were a straight swap. Iíd say the change was made between initial build and 1972, which was when the MK3 Workshop Manual was printed. The issue I see with fitting a modern alternator is that if I want to keep using the original Amp meter in the gauge cluster, I would have to bypass the voltage regulator, upgrade the wiring to handle the higher current, and work out how to fit a shunt to the Amp meter to stop it having a meltdown. These old generators were rated at 40 amps. The one I bought when I replaced the dead one in my Discovery is rated at 120 amps and it is nothing special. Iíd like a decent size alternator eventually, as I plan on setting the truck up with a battery bank that I can load in the back for running a fridge and stuff when I travel around. While stationary, I can throw some solar panels out, but a good alternator would quickly top the bank up when travelling. 

I havenít yet replaced the air actuator diaphragm. Itís on my list of things to do, and I have to do it before I refit the brake lines. Iím thinking of getting the neoprene version as it is designed to be all-weather. The MK3 Workshop Manual shows the actuator originally had a filter that the air moved through when displaced by the movement of the diaphragm. This was supposedly to stop dust and crud getting in. The books for the MK4 and 6x6 Inters donít show this, and my air actuator is one of the later models. It has 3 holes drilled into the casing on the low pressure side for the air to get out. I figured I would fit the all-weather neoprene one and keep the current one as a spare. It seemed in very good condition, with no cracks or other deterioration visible. Better to be safe than wrapped around a tree with no brakes though.

I adjusted the master/slave clutch pushrods exactly as shown in the Workshop Manual. It said to leave a small amount of slack on each end and I figured there was a reason for that. Now I know what it was. 

It feels like I am finally getting somewhere, now that I have started putting bits back on. The next step will be removing the passenger side fuel tank and the back chain boxes. Then I need to drop the transfer case and winch so I can clean and repaint the rear chassis rails. Once thatís done I can replace the air lines to the rear Tractor Protection Valve and the auxiliary brake connectors at the back.

I wish I had a shed. Sitting out the back in the open like it is, I will be fighting a constant battle with the rust in the cab. I need to win Lotto, buy the place Iím renting and build a huge shed in the back yard. I even drew the shed up on Friday while it was raining. 5 bays, each 6m wide and 10m deep, with the 2 end bays enclosed and the 3 middle ones with 4m x 4m roller doors. 6m to the eaves so I can have a mezzanine floor over each of the enclosed bays.



Ah well, I can dream.

Greg.

Offline Mick_Marsh

  • REMLR Inc
  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 1978
  • THANKS 103
  • Location: Western Victoria
  • REMLR No: 310
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #91 on: April 27, 2015, 10:47:30 AM »
I wish I had a shed. Sitting out the back in the open like it is, I will be fighting a constant battle with the rust in the cab. I need to win Lotto, buy the place Iím renting and build a huge shed in the back yard. I even drew the shed up on Friday while it was raining. 5 bays, each 6m wide and 10m deep, with the 2 end bays enclosed and the 3 middle ones with 4m x 4m roller doors. 6m to the eaves so I can have a mezzanine floor over each of the enclosed bays.



Ah well, I can dream.

Greg.
You and me both, buddy.

That would be a suitable workshop for me. I'd also need a storage/display shed.
I must get that winning Tatts ticket.
REMLR # 310, MVCA # 364, 101 Club # 2188, MHG #101
29-417 101 GS, 30-248 101 Rapier Tractor. 30-238 101
34-597 Crump & Cornish 1 ton Cargo Trailer
RT21 RAAF Track Tactical Trailer, 234-671 RAAF Track Tactical Trailer

Offline GGG

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 189
  • THANKS 26
  • Location: Sydney
  • REMLR No: 428
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #92 on: April 27, 2015, 07:56:02 PM »
Greg,
I know that something happened to my post, I got interrupted.
I would say that the grey stuff in your oil filter would be Molybond or similar. I had the same effect in my series three when I first got it. The sump also had layers of that and sludge like the rings in a tree. I realised that the sump had to come off when the oil was reluctant to drain out the drain hole. I think that the bloke that owned it between me and the army only put petrol in it because he worked out that it would stop if he didn't.
Back in my brief time in the Army I seem to remember seeing an instruction that Molybond was to be used in just about everything. By then I had decided that it didn't live up to expectations and so, it would appear, did the rank and file in RAEME who usually "forgot" to put it in our vehicles.
The upside down oil filter cartridge was a bit gnarly. I wonder how long it had been like that. Never mind you have fixed it now.
You appear to be travelling pretty well with your restoration, keep up the good work.
Geoff.

Offline Acco 4x4

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 88
  • THANKS 5
  • Location: Toongabbie
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #93 on: April 27, 2015, 08:21:02 PM »
Hi Greg,
Interesting stuff re salt corrosion..... I have never come across it, the sand i use is washed beach sand or similar grade and dried... It is the stuff i get from work (god love the railways, always got what you need in stock!) lol! I also started with the basic hose blaster but for every reason you have mentioned it didn't last long in my shed before i found a better use for it in the scrap bin. My only complaint with the hopper style is you do use the sand rather quickly but with the sand ready in a bucket and a plastic cup ready i have got it down to a fine art <30 seconds in the pits filling the hopper. The heavy woven wire wheels for grinders are also the go as you have mentioned. I usually make a day of sand blasting as yes it goes everywhere including places where sand shouldn't be unless you have been to the beach on a rough day...

A smaller Bosch internal regulated alternator will work with the standard amp meter but exactly as you said a big one will need a shunt. After doing some quick calculations, a 40 amp alternator will be suitably  sufficient as there isn't any real current draw after the stock is running even with everything on.

As for your shed, If you move to NSW i will supply the farm to build your shed on and we can have 2 accos in there!

Love your work mate keep it up!
Tim

Offline john.k

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 169
  • THANKS 27
  • Location: brisbane
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #94 on: April 27, 2015, 09:18:09 PM »
I suggest you only sandblast actual rust patches.These trucks were prepared with multiple coats of chromate ,phosphoric etch ,primer etc etc to stop corrosion long term,and blasting to bare metal and spraying red oxide and top coat is not a tenth as good.Typically simple repaints break down very quickly in the weather,unless the original prep is left.If you must blast to bare metal,try to spray with inorganic zinc ethyl silicate/zinc powder as a first coat.I dont think you can buy chromate any more.EPA.Incidentally,you should know that air blasting with white sand is a no no EPA wise,with penalties.Garnet comes in two varieties-lovely pink West Australian and brown dirty Indian garnet.The Indian garnet is often washed with salt water,causing chloride[salt] contamination.Dont breathe the dust from white sand,it will kill you later on,just like asbestos,it takes a while.Regards John.

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #95 on: April 27, 2015, 11:34:40 PM »
Thanks for the replies.
I think the sludge in the bottom of the filter housing accumulated after it left the army, as the oil cooler hoses were disconnected at some point and the cooler is spotless inside. I doubt the army would have allowed the truck to be used without the hoses. If the sludge was from the truck's time in the army, it would be in the cooler too. Either way, its out now. I might drop the sump pan anyway, just to take a look. The oil drained out well, but if I take the pan off, I can look for lost engine bits and knock all the dings out so it empties fully. Its pretty banged up.

The grit I am using is the nice pink stuff. Easy to sweep it up but hard to blow away. Its pretty dense. For small components, I made up a 2' x 2' x 2' box covered with that black weed mesh. It allows the air through but not the grit. I can collect most of it and run it through my kitchen sieve and use it again. Any time I sand blast, I wear a dual-filter mask. Its uncomfortable and hot and causes my safety glasses to fog up when I don't have it tight enough, but there is no way I will risk silicosis of the lungs.

I really only sandblast the brass fittings and rusted pockets where I can't get the wire wheel into. The majority of the stuff I remove is the top coats of Olive Drab paint. It comes off easily as it doesn't seem to have bonded into the lower coats. So far, what I have found is that the chassis rails and cross members that I have cleaned and repainted have 3 distinct layers. The top is usually several coats of the standard Olive Drab. They are over a single layer of Deep Bronze Green. That stuff is so well bonded to the truck that if I get to a clean layer of it, I just run over it to clear the olive drab off and rough it up a bit so the new paint binds. The layer under that looks like a red oxide. That stuff is even worse than the DBG. If I get down to that, I know the metal is perfect under it.
The problem I have is that the truck has been used to cart or spray on a farm, and the chemicals have run through the tray and down the chassis rails. Where it ran onto the transfer case, it totally ate the aluminium Mod plate. All that was left were the little brass pins that held it in place. It also dissolved the steel air lines from behind the cab to the very back. The mid toolbox had no bottom and even the sides and back were eaten away to half their size. In some places, the red oxide stuff is still there, and where it survived, the steel is smooth. In most places though, the chassis rails have shallow pitting right through all layers. Anywhere that shows rust, I clean back to the red oxide or bare metal with the wire wheel. Then I wipe it all down with turps and allow it to fully dry. Then it gets a coat of rust converter. Once that has dried, any area that doesn't show as glossy black gets more wire wheeling and another coat of rust converter. So far there have only been a few spots where it took 3 goes. The worst is the metal pipe that braces the spare wheel holder against the far side chassis rail and I think this was because it was a later mod and never got painted.
Once the rust converter has worked, it gets a good wash down to neutralise any left over acid, then a wipe down with turps. Next it gets a good coat of an industrial Super Etch Primer and gets to cure for at least a day. Finally, if its out where it can be seen, it gets 2 coats of the Protec Camo Green and left to harden up. Inside the chassis rails and anywhere underneath that will get road grit and gravel or excessive moisture, I have put 2 coats of that bitumen based Underbody Black. It looks good and should protect it well, but it takes ages to dry properly and you can't paint over it.

I got a couple of sealing rings for the filter housing today and cleaned the last of the sludge out. I also got the steel flat bar to make the radiator brace but ran out of daylight. I'll get a few small things done after work each day and hopefully the weekend will be fine so I can get in and get some major things done.

Thanks for reading.
Greg.

Offline Chazza

  • REMLR Inc
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 445
  • THANKS 83
  • Location: Narrogin
  • REMLR No: 217
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #96 on: April 28, 2015, 08:42:07 AM »
Nice write-up Greg and I am glad that you are looking after your own health regarding your breathing protection.  :D

I too have plans for a shed and like yours it was a mega-shed, but I think that now I have witnessed the absolute devastation that fire causes to sheds, that I may diversify my assets into several sheds. Top of the list will be a fire sprinkler system in each shed!

Advantages of several sheds:
1. Two sheds really only cost the extra price of one extra end-wall.
2. Restored classics in the garage, are not getting showered with angle grinder grit; spray-drift and welding sparks.
3. If a fire starts you don't lose everything.
4. Hot work such as welding; metal casting; forging and oxy-cutting, can be completely separated from anything flammable all of the time.
5. The machine shop; spray booth; engine assembly area; can be a special shed where dust ingress is limited to an absolute minimum. Dust is the bane of my life in my current 1930's, dodgy-brothers shed!

I have the land; I have the dosh; but of course I don't have the time!

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline john.k

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 169
  • THANKS 27
  • Location: brisbane
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #97 on: April 30, 2015, 08:19:58 PM »
I suggest you consider a simple four poster 3mx3m flat roof type carport,which will cover the cab and keep the nightly  dew  off and also is effective in most rain without high winds.I know a fellow with a nice Studebaker 6x6 and a simple carport would stop the deterioration its undergoing,but he refuses.Most councils allow a 3x3 without planning permission. Years ago ,when old motorbikes were plentiful and cheap/free my next door neighbour used sheets of old gal roofing to make "teepees" to cover his  collection,and it was surprising how dry everything stayed under them.Regards John.

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #98 on: May 03, 2015, 09:57:50 AM »
Thanks John, it would be a simple job, but I'm renting. If I win the Lotto jackpot next weekend I'll see if the landlord will sell and I'll built my dream shed.  ;D

Well, during the week I chased around town looking for the square section o'ring that seals the oil filter to the housing with no luck. Nobody had seen such a thing in years. I'd previously bought the Ryco R2084P filter for it, but when I looked in the box it only had the single seal fitted to the end of it. I remembered reading they had changed something with these filters and people were looking for an o'ring separately. After much running around, I got a round section o'ring and got it fitted. It was very tight and ended up about 2" too long once I squeezed it into the groove. I cut a section out and used a spot of super glue to rejoin the ends. I put the oil filter canister back on without the filter as I was going to run the flush through it. No sense ruining a new filter for that.
I filled the engine with cheap oil and the flush stuff and started it up. After about 15 minutes, I stopped it and checked the oil level. All was good but the sump was only slightly warm. It seems to take a while to get the oil up to running temp. I ran it for another 10 minutes or so and heard a sort of squeaking sound every now and then. The temp and oil pressure gauges were right where they should be, so I got out and had a look around the front. Oh great. There was oil trickling down the outside of the canister, right about where the join in the o'ring was. As I leaned under to feel the sump, I found a steady stream of water running down the side of the block. The seal in the damn water pump had failed. Since I got this truck back near New Year, I have had it running for about 2 hours and all was fine. I suppose that with the radiator full and a new radiator cap on, the engine would finally have been running with the cooling system pressurised.
At least the pump seal failed before I put the new coolant/anti freeze/boil/corrosion in it. I shut it down and wiped the oil filter canister clean and figured I better drain the oil while it was hot. So typically, that was when it started to bucket down. Stupid weather. Half of me was getting soaked and the other half kept getting burnt off the muffler, but I got the oil out. I let it settle in the drain pan for a while and poured it into a clean oil drum in case I decide to run it again if the flush wasn't complete. Even though it was brand new oil and had only been in there running for 30 minutes, it was pitch black. At the very bottom of the pan I found tiny specks of grey stuff. They weren't hard and they smeared like grease when I poked them. I think it was little specks of that grey sludge I found in the bottom of the oil filter canister. Good to see that the flush was working.
Today, when I had planned to get stuck into cleaning and rebuilding the driveshafts, I will now drain and remove the radiator again so I can get the water pump off.
While out and about yesterday, I tried getting some new spark plugs. The ones in it are the Bosche W95T6 ones that are what the RPS say it should have. Apparently, they haven't been made for years. The books say the replacements are either NGK BP4 or Champion J12YC.
Has anyone got a preference for one over the other? Or suggest another plug totally? After running to every shop in Devonport that sold plugs, it turned out nobody had any of the NGK or Champion ones anyway. Repco said they had some in stock at Burnie, 50km away, but they would be shut by the time I got there.
The plugs in the truck are pretty bad. A couple have really badly eroded arm things on the end and others have really worn down electrodes. Being the proper Bosche plugs, I guess they are pretty old. While going through the RPS, I got the part numbers for the points, condenser coil, dizzy cap and rotor, as well as info on the suppression capacitor for the coil. I also have to get new plug leads. Has anyone got recommendations on brand or anything? I saw at Repco and Supercheap that you can buy them separately or in sets, but are there differences in the leads? I saw some were thicker than others. Do I just match the lengths of the ones I have now or are there other things to take into consideration?

Finally, the MK4 RPS shows the number of the rebuild kit for the water pump is 858339R92. It is an IH part number but would the MK3 be the same? I still haven't found an actual MK3 RPS. If it is the same, does anyone have any idea where to get one? There is an Iveco place in Burnie, but I don't know if they would be able to source such old parts.

Oh, and just to round out such an awesome day, I went to get on the forum here to ask these questions and found something was wrong as I only got a line of text. Then, when I tried calling Phoenix to see if it was my PC or the forum, the speaker and power button on my phone decided they were allergic to rain and went on strike.
Luckily, the phone dried out overnight and works again and its a lovely sunny day, so I'm going out to pull the radiator and water pump out, so lets see what else can go wrong to totally complete the weekend. At least the pump failed now and not miles from home sometime down the track. Oh, and when I pulled the new Ryco oil filter out of the box to compare it to the original one, I found that there were 2 of the proper square section o'rings under the plastic shrink wrap. Oops.  ;D

Greg.

Offline Acco 4x4

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 88
  • THANKS 5
  • Location: Toongabbie
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #99 on: May 03, 2015, 10:37:11 AM »
Hi Greg, Total bummer mate!
My Iveco filter came with the square o ring for the top, disappointed yours didn't.  I have made up a list for the electrical bits for a MK3, as others have mentioned before, by the time our trucks were disposed from the army, they had all bits and pieces from all models on them. I have been able to convert (with a real lot of trouble) the original bosch part numbers to the current system.

Spark Plugs NGK BP6S (some will disagree but i will NEVER use champion crap on anything i own, as far as driving to the authorised of town for a NGK plug for my lawn mower!)
All following are Bosch

Points GB543 or BG543-3 Depends on the one in the truck, difference is a slot in the base

Ignition Cap GB75

Couldn't cross the rotor button, should be the same as early ford, holden...... pull it out and take it to your parts shop, they will be able to match it.

With the leads, pull all 7 off and take them down to the parts store and match them up. I personally prefer all Bosch components as they are the best of the worst, meaning that they are all crap now... I will also happily use Repco parts as they also still seam to control quality.

Ok, tune up as follows, I set point gap to .35mm and final setting by Dwell gauge on multimeter, if you don't have a dwell meter, set to .4mm

If you end up with carbon core leads, be careful not to bend them too much as the carbon track can be damaged and you will end up with an engine that runs like a busted ass

Ignition timing to 6 degrees (factory) I run it at 8 degrees goes better.
I am currently organising an electronic ignition setup as a direct replacement when i get it sorted I will post the findings, as there is so  much available but nothing sold exactly for it.

BTW can i recommend if you run your engine again, My suggestion is to always use a filter, even if it was the old one as new oil and engine flush will dislodge contaminants within the engine and they can be pumped around the motor, bearings don't like contaminants, too close tolerance.

If it makes you feel better, I've been rained out all weekend too! lol

Take care, Keep up the good work!

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #100 on: May 03, 2015, 12:09:01 PM »
Thanks for that.
My Ryco filter does actually have the square o'rings with it, but they were under the shrink wrapping and I didn't realise until this morning.  ;D
Are you sure about those BP6S plugs, because I actually looked in the NGK book at the cross-reference chart and it definitely stated that the BP4 plugs were the ones to replace the original Bosch W95T6 ones. It will be great if that's right as the BP6S plugs are sold in blister packs of 6 and come out way cheaper, not to mention they are far more readily available.
With the points, I guess I will have to pull them out to check. The MK4 RPS says that they are Bosch 1237013054, but that is also for the "current" version of the distributor. Your numbers are going to give me somewhere to start.
The cap, GB75, matches the book, but I will check if mine is the same. I read an old AULRO post stating that the distributors were often swapped out and it could be from a MK3, 4, or even from the 6x6's.
The rotor button number was GB599 and there are 2 compatible ones on eBay now, from Belgium.
I'll wait until I get the water pump back on and have it running before I start switching the ignition bits. That way, I can change 1 thing at a time so I know what to check when it suddenly doesn't run.  ;D

Well, it didn't take much time at all to get the radiator and water pump out. Once the support brackets are removed and the hoses are off, it's just a matter of standing with one foot on the bumper and the other on the step-ladder, taking a deep breath and lifting the whole thing up and out without hitting the fan or the horn bracket, while clenching everything tight so as not to blow a ring gear. Easy.  ;D
Then lower it to rest on the bumper while stepping off the ladder, and getting your hands in the right position to pick it up without squashing the fins. While carrying it over to rest against the fence, I managed to pour a load of water right into my boot, but its out now.
I dropped the belt and unbolted the pump. When I got it cleaned up and the back plate off, I could see that the gasket between the pump and block was just a piece of cardboard from a cornflakes box. I could just make out part of the writing. When I replace it, I'll use some gasket goop to make sure it doesn't leak.

As you can see in the first pic, the water was getting past the seal and running out the hole on the front. In the second pic, you can see that the tips of the impeller have been damaged at some stage. Not sure this will be a problem or not.



It looks like the pump has been dismantled at some stage, as there is the impression of one of the impeller blades in the metal housing, as if the shaft was pressed out and the impeller held on hard. Its not deep, so hopefully it will be ok. The bearing seems ok, as there is no play in the shaft, but it did start squeaking, which is why I got out to check.
Now I just need to find a kit somewhere and get it all back on.

Greg.

Offline GGG

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 189
  • THANKS 26
  • Location: Sydney
  • REMLR No: 428
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #101 on: May 03, 2015, 07:15:51 PM »
Looks like you are travelling pretty well. One question. Is pouring water into your boot part of the procedure for this job?
Ducks behind cover!
Geoff.

Offline Acco 4x4

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 88
  • THANKS 5
  • Location: Toongabbie
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #102 on: May 03, 2015, 08:26:59 PM »
I am on the floor laughing yes sorry laughing at your boot full! Been there done that still makes me laugh!😂😂😂😂😂😂😂
Apart from being the best, NGK has a very simple Id system and it is easy to find suitable replacements for discontinued items.

B is the thread and hex stile, so in our case 14mm or 13/16 thread with 20.8 mm hex head.
P is a protruded tip, this is the earth tab and the centre electrode with its porcelain shielding.
Now in our case we have a number, this represents the operating heat range from 2 - 11, 2 being a hot type down to 11 being cold.
Depending on where your cross reference comes from the Bosch plug crosses over to several NGK types, all basically the same. So in your case 4 is two increments hotter than a 6 so really a 4,5 or 6 will suffice well. Depending on your fuel, tune of the engine, compression, ambient temperature and working load variations in plug temperature will be used. A too hot plug can lead to pre ignition or pinging which ultimately causes engine failure in worst case, where as a plug too cold will in worst case foul and not fire. Most old Holden engines build in a similar manner will run a 5 or 6 plug so depending on your case I would recommend either the 5 or 6 and see how it goes, reason is they are cheaper and easier to get. The difference from 4-5-6 is not really worth worrying about. If your concerned, run a BP5S and once she is on the road, check it after a good drive.
So back to the code the last character in our case "S" is just the length of the thread, so S being 9.5mm or 3/8 inch long.
So, a BP4 is a 14mm thread diameter with 20.8 mm hex, protruded tip , 4 heat range and with no further characters will be 3/8 inch long if it has a 14mm thread.
We can go on for ages with iridium tip plugs and the like but it has no real reliivance to our conversation.
Summary, if you can get BP5S use them otherwise 6 will be fine.
Can I suggest using Hylomar made by ACL, comes in a small grey silver pressure pack, spray it on new gaskets, either paper or cork, works perfect and doesn't fill oil galleries up with left overs. Things like silicon should be left for fish tanks and ladies...........
Hope I haven't confused everyone.....
Tim.

Offline Acco 4x4

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 88
  • THANKS 5
  • Location: Toongabbie
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #103 on: May 03, 2015, 08:28:38 PM »
Oh yes and your impeller looks fine., probably damaged when the pump was overhauled before. Don't forget to replace the bearings too😄

Offline Chazza

  • REMLR Inc
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 445
  • THANKS 83
  • Location: Narrogin
  • REMLR No: 217
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #104 on: May 04, 2015, 08:50:23 AM »
Three cheers for NGK plugs from me as well!

I use iridium plugs now; so far I have never had to replace one and they have been in the Disco for about 100 000km.

Be aware that pressing that impeller off might break it, so you really need a kit with a new one in it. An agricultural parts dealer would be a good place to look for parts,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64