Author Topic: Inter 170-952  (Read 47949 times)

Offline Chazza

  • REMLR Inc
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 445
  • THANKS 83
  • Location: Narrogin
  • REMLR No: 217
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #30 on: December 21, 2014, 03:33:19 PM »
The trouble with putting a flushing agent in when the new radiator is fitted, is that it will block the new radiator.  :(

Can you rig a 20 litre drum at the front of the truck sitting on the brush guard or something? At the bottom of the drum, braze or solder an outlet for for the hose; the drum does not need a top on it and the top hose can dump its water straight into the top. Obviously the hoses will need to be quite long - a farm machinery dealer is likely to have something of the correct diameter. If you tie a stocking to the top hose it will catch the debris.

I use RMI 25 as the flushing agent - it even breaks down hard-water scale!

If you do this; run the engine at about 1500 rpm for at least 10 hours to give the RMI 25 time to work and the engine needs to get to operating temperature, so the thermostat needs to be in,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline Mick_Marsh

  • REMLR Inc
  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 1978
  • THANKS 103
  • Location: Western Victoria
  • REMLR No: 310
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #31 on: December 21, 2014, 05:52:13 PM »
Unfortunately, yes it was.
Oooo....
I was wanting to get out and look at that one.

I thought it was a nice one.
REMLR # 310, MVCA # 364, 101 Club # 2188, MHG #101
29-417 101 GS, 30-248 101 Rapier Tractor. 30-238 101
34-597 Crump & Cornish 1 ton Cargo Trailer
RT21 RAAF Track Tactical Trailer, 234-671 RAAF Track Tactical Trailer

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #32 on: December 21, 2014, 05:52:51 PM »
Thanks for that Charlie.
I'd never heard of RMI 25 before but it seems like it does a good job. I'll chase around town tomorrow after work and see if I can get some.
I can get the hose and a skin-fitting (outlet) from the ships chandlers. Would be quicker than brazing and I can remove it afterwards.
I'll have to go over all the wiring first as I don't have all the gauges working at the moment. I need to give the oil system a proper flush so I can do it at the same time.

I got the seats out this morning, with lots of swearing and barked knuckles. I was by myself and kept having to get inside to put the spanner back on the bolt head as they are not fixed.
The replacement bolts will be. Once I get the frame all cleaned up and painted, I'm going to tack weld the bolt heads to the brackets that hold the seat frame down.
I got the original rubber floor mats out. They are rock hard and now broken into several pieces, but they will make good templates for when I cut new ones.
There was well over 1/2" of dirt between the mats and the floor. One of the large rubber bungs was still fitted so I popped it out and hosed/scrubbed the entire cab out.
The floors on both sides are going to have to be cut out and replaced. Luckily, they are the same thickness steel as the sheets I removed from the frame around the tray.
As the weather here seems to be turning bad, I replaced the door on the passenger's side so its all weather-tight again.
I got underneath and started following and measuring pipes. So far I need about 12m of 1/2" and 8m of 3/8". I haven't worked out how much of the 5/16" and 1/4" I need yet.
It seems to all be short lengths so I may just get a 25' roll of each, as I can get that locally. I know I need more than what I have measured so far, but I need the tray off to see where else it runs.

Greg.

Offline cookey

  • REMLR Inc
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 144
  • THANKS 57
  • ex-crafty
  • Location: sydney
  • REMLR No: 356
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #33 on: December 23, 2014, 03:49:00 PM »


If you do this; run the engine at about 1500 rpm for at least 10 hours to give the RMI 25 time to work and the engine needs to get to operating temperature, so the thermostat needs to be in,

Cheers Charlie
[/quote]

10 hours running at 1500rpm will cost a fortune in fuel.
I would think 15 minutes would be sufficient.

Cookey
lost count

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #34 on: December 23, 2014, 05:54:06 PM »
I looked up the RMI 25 stuff and it actually does take this long to do its job. The guy recoring my radiator has offered me a dose of the commercial stuff he uses in his business for free. His stuff is a flush that is supposed to free up rust and scale and takes 15 to 30 mins max. I think I will use his stuff while the radiator is out, to clean the block and head out, then put the RMI 25 in after I put it all back together and start actually driving it. That way I won't force all the rubbish into my new core and the RMI 25 can do its job, which is as a protectant as well as a cleaner. Anything left after the commercial cleaner shouldn't be a problem to the radiator.

Offline Chazza

  • REMLR Inc
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 445
  • THANKS 83
  • Location: Narrogin
  • REMLR No: 217
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #35 on: December 23, 2014, 08:44:52 PM »


If you do this; run the engine at about 1500 rpm for at least 10 hours to give the RMI 25 time to work and the engine needs to get to operating temperature, so the thermostat needs to be in,

Cheers Charlie

"10 hours running at 1500rpm will cost a fortune in fuel.
I would think 15 minutes would be sufficient." Cookey

It will take at least this long and usually longer if hard-water scale is present. I first used it in my P6 years ago, which had been filled with very hard Perth-tap-water, and despite running it for the prescribed period, months later the new radiator had 1/3 of the tubes blocked with lime-scale and had to be rodded. At least it worked though and years later when I had the engine reconditioned there was no sign of scale anywhere.

If I was to do the same thing again, I would fit a TEFBA strainer in the top hose to catch all the lumpy bits; this allows the fines to be circulated, which can be flushed out regularly.

Even with cast iron engines, some lumps will come loose so have a look for TEFBA now Rav,  :D

Cheers Charlie
Cookey
[/quote]
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #36 on: December 23, 2014, 10:49:03 PM »
One of the better car parts places in town sells the RMI25 and recommended I also use a sort of fine mesh sock thing that you put over the radiator intake. They sell it as a kit.
The top radiator hose goes over it and holds it in place and it feeds back into the top radiator tank. They suggest replacing it when you do your coolant changes.
Sounds like the thing you mean. It would catch all of the chunky bits that flush through.
I got the fan and compressor belts off tonight. The compressor belt is a standard B section belt, 51" on the inside. Its listed as a Goodyear B51.
The fan belt is smaller in diameter, but seems wider across the top. The RPS lists it as an IH product. I'll take them in tomorrow and see what modern replacements are available.
As I replace bits, I am making a list of the currently available part numbers and will post them all up eventually. It would be a good sort of reference list that all of us
with the MK3/4 or F1/F2's could use. Maybe once we get it written up, we could get a Mod to sticky it in the Inter forum. Its a real pain having to search all the posts here and on AULRO.
I'm surprised the people with the different series of Landys hasn't done this. I suppose a lot of their parts are still standard Landrover products though.

Greg.

Offline Chazza

  • REMLR Inc
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 445
  • THANKS 83
  • Location: Narrogin
  • REMLR No: 217
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #37 on: December 24, 2014, 09:10:49 AM »
Here is the TEFBA link http://tefba.com

They are very convenient because no coolant is lost, whilst the strainer is cleaned; they do need a longish straight-run of hose to install it into, however.

I am interested in the one you have found, it might fit my Alpine and my S1 which have ridiculously short top hoses. Have you a brand name?

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #38 on: December 24, 2014, 11:29:56 AM »
The ones I saw are called Cleanflow Radiator Socks.
Same as the ones shown on this guys page,
http://www.derek.com.au/cleanflowfilter.html
Looks like they come in a range of sizes.

Offline Chazza

  • REMLR Inc
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 445
  • THANKS 83
  • Location: Narrogin
  • REMLR No: 217
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #39 on: December 25, 2014, 06:41:35 PM »
Thanks Cobber!

I have ordered one so I will see how it goes,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #40 on: December 27, 2014, 06:37:26 PM »
Hi all.
Got a bit done today. The wind has been blowing a gale and making things difficult.
I sprayed the engine with loads of degreaser and hit it with the pressure washer. Most of the gunge came off. Much of it ended up on me.
It looks like the last paint used on the engine was a sort of grey/green colour. Much lighter than the Olive Drab the rest of the truck was painted.
Under that paint, the tappet cover seems to be a gold/bronze colour. I thought I actually had a brass cover at first, but it sounded too tinny and a magnet sticks to it.
The main block came up fairly clean. There are still a lot of nooks and crannies that I need to respray and scrub before blasting again.
That can wait until the wind dies down. I'm not looking forward to doing the underside.
I am cleaning and repainting the air cleaner housing as it was pretty rough. The bottom oil pan was badly dented in and had a layer of oil over a thick deposit of sludge.
It was almost like tar. I soaked it overnight in a bit of diesel and got it all out. I belted the bottom back into shape, wire wheeled it back to bare metal and gave it a couple of coats of etch primer.
I'm a bit confused about the air cleaner though. The "aaco-serv-man-part-1-A-D" states that you "Remove filter element. Wash in kerosene." The filter thing in mine doesn't seem to come out.



I tried wiggling it but there was no movement at all. Am I doing something wrong or does it just need loosening up?
The air intake holes in the sides are mostly clogged up with greasy muck. I'm surprised it could breathe at all.
The MK4 RPS doesn't show a separate air filter element, so maybe its all one piece and I am supposed to soak the whole thing. I definitely don't want to force it and damage something.

Greg.

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #41 on: December 28, 2014, 08:34:26 PM »
Got another tiny bit done today.
I degreased the outside of the air cleaner and used a flat stick with rag around it to clean out between the inner and outer sections of the housing.
Sections of the outside were fairly rusty so I decided to clean them up with the wire wheel on the grinder. It works well, but you have to really hold onto it.
Next time I think I will need to find some way of securing the bit I am cleaning so I can use both hands on the grinder.
Its ok on the flats, but tends to jump and flick around it you touch an edge or curve.



Now I'm up for a new work shirt. Oh well.
I had to clean the inner filter element as it was really greasy and full of dust and grit. I remembered I had an old 4L can of 2-stroke chainsaw fuel
that was well past its use-by date, so I poured it through the air cleaner, which was sitting in a clean tray, then filtered it through a paint strainer
and repeated until no more grit came out. I had to do it 5 or 6 times, but the filter mesh looks very shiny now.
After that, I sat it in the sun for a while to dry out and then wiped it over with a rag soaked in turps. Once that evaporated,
I gave it 2 coats of primer and later a top coat of camo green. It came up looking pretty good.



Greg.

Offline Ravvin

  • REMLR Inc
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 522
  • THANKS 60
  • Location: Wesley Vale, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 432
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #42 on: January 01, 2015, 07:54:50 PM »
Hi all.
Well, I got a bit more done. I started at the compressor and pulled out all the air lines, working back to the reservoir.
Most of the ones under the cab are fine, just rusty. Any that were under the tray are pretty much stuffed.
The 1/2" line from the compressor back to the reservoir was mostly good. I'm just a bit concerned about the last 6" as there is a 90 bend and where the metal was stretched when it was formed, it is deeply pitted.
I don't want to replace the whole line as the rest is really good, so I think I might just cut the last foot of it off, make a 90 bend in a new piece of 1/2" pipe, and put a joiner in.
Better a few dollars for a brass joiner now than a blown air line and no brakes later.
There is another smaller line running from the governor back to the tyre inflation valve. I had to totally replace this line as the 1/4" pipe just collapsed when I tried to undo it from the valve.
There was another short 1/4" line running from the inflation valve down to a tee on the end of the air reservoir. I had to replace this as it had a section missing where it went through the chassis rail.

I was able to get all the lines that connected to the reservoir undone without breaking anything. The air reservoir is held in place by 2 lengths of 5/16" rod that wrap around the cylinder and then go through the chassis rail,
where they are threaded and have standard UNF nuts to pull them tight. I bought a die nut and was able to clean all 4 threads before undoing them. It made it very easy, but I still managed to snap one off.
When I looked at the broken end, it was rusty part way through so I think it was already cracked. When I replace the tank, I am thinking of making a set of straps out of 2mm steel, about 40mm wide.
I'll glue a strip of conveyor belting to it and wrap it around the tank. I'll cut and shape a couple of thick blocks to go between the tank and the inside of the chassis rail and weld a section of threaded rod to each end of the straps so I can do them up, similar to the original system.
I won't be putting the lines and tank back on just yet. While they are out of the way, I am going to clean and repaint the inside, outside and bottom of the chassis rails for as far as I can reach.

Here's a pic of the reservoir before I started work on it.



This is the over-pressure relief valve. It wouldn't move at all and there's no way it could have done its job.



When I pulled it apart, I found that they had fitted it with the vent hole facing up and the paint had run in and blocked the rod.

This is what the reservoir looks like now.



I cleaned it back to bare metal with a wire wheel on the grinder, then gave it a coat of rust converter. This showed up quite a few sections I had missed, and it took 2 more goes with the wire wheel and rust converter before I got it all.
Once I neutralised it, I etch primed it, then gave it a coat of underbody black. I think this should help protect it, as its pretty exposed to rocks and scrub.
I haven't decided if I should paint the chassis rails, air lines and reservoir in Olive Drab or black. From what I can tell, the entire truck used to be Deep Bronze Green.
However they did it, the original paint is still in great condition under the newer Olive Drab.
For now, I think I will just etch prime everything and coat it with underbody black. If it doesn't look right, later when I get the tray off I will overcoat it in whatever colour I finally decide on.

The next step is to remove and clean or replace the pipes going from the back of the reservoir. these run up the drivers side chassis rail and feed the winch control, high/low 4wd lockout, the brake pedal and trailer brake control.
These look pretty good, so barring any mishaps, they should just need a clean and sand. From there, it gets tricky.
The line from the brake pedal to the actuator and master cylinder looks good, but the lines running back to the tractor protection valve have been replaced with lengths of compressor hose and normal old hose clamps.
I'm pretty sure the originals used to be 1/2" and I can't get any of that for a while, so I might just cap off the lines for now so I can test the front half for leaks.
The lines running from the winch control to the actuator cylinder on the winch have to be completely replaced. They have rusted through and there is about a foot missing from both lines.
Luckily for me, there is enough left for me to copy when I get my 3/8" pipe.

When I sit under the truck facing the rear, just above and behind the air reservoir and above the transfer case is a cross member. Across the top run the 2x 3/8" lines for the winch controls.
Below that runs a 1/2" line that takes air from the reservoir to the controls up front. Below that is the remains of another 3/8" line. Its rusted through both ends and I'm not sure what it originally was.
There's nothing in the chassis rails on either side that would have connected to it. The only thing I can think of is that it may have been a line feeding the actuator on the back of the transfer case that locks out 4wd.
If it is, it must have originally run down the passenger's side chassis rail, across the cross member and then down the driver's side rail until it connected to the flexible line on the transfer case.
The line currently connected to the back of the transfer case appears to be a replacement as it is copper and looks to have been made of soft rolled tubing as it is pretty bendy where it runs along the rail towards the front.
Most of the original tubing was hard drawn steel, so pretty straight.

One job I should have done before painting the air reservoir was to clean it out. I had about a cup of slimy jelly run out when I removed the seized drain valve.
There was no smell, other than a sort of stale oil odour, which I think is a good sign. I know from past experience with the old steel scuba tanks that corrosion in a steel tank gives off a nasty acidic smell and I didn't notice that.
I'll have to clean it out and borrow the bore camera from work to see inside. Any idea what the best thing to clean the inside would be?

Greg.

Offline Chazza

  • REMLR Inc
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 445
  • THANKS 83
  • Location: Narrogin
  • REMLR No: 217
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #43 on: January 02, 2015, 09:55:49 AM »
It is nice to see your attention to detail on a safety-system Rav!

I can't think of a cleaner, except perhaps steam, to do the inside of the reservoir. Mixing flammable cleaner-residue with hot compressed air, is probably something to keep clear of!

Considering the age of the vessel and the rust you have been finding, it might be a good idea to have the reservoir pressure tested with water, just in case rust has weakened it,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline dkg001

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
  • THANKS 27
  • Location: albury
Re: Inter 170-952
« Reply #44 on: January 02, 2015, 11:27:51 AM »
Good work! Did you check the non-return valve on the inlet side of the tank?