Author Topic: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.  (Read 5011 times)

Offline Philthy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 534
  • THANKS 71
  • Location: Brisbane
  • REMLR No: 425
I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.

I can hear the driver now to the instructor  >:(  ďOf course my wheels are straight!Ē



Offline Phoenix

  • Administrator
  • Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 2164
  • THANKS 85
    • REMLR
  • Location: Launceston, Tasmania
  • REMLR No: 129
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2014, 04:55:38 PM »
I think it was the risk factor being fairly high, and land rovers not really being used in places where it was necessary.  that and portable bridging and pontoon equipment becoming more available.   Same reasons amphibious vehicles mostly died out.

That said, the australian army did have some such equipment as well for their land rovers, not just the poms.
REMLR Webmaster
Eden - 1961 Series 2 Ambulance, 108-098

Offline FFRMAN

  • REMLR Committee
  • Veteran
  • ***
  • Posts: 2797
  • THANKS 207
  • Location: Western Vic.
  • REMLR No: 314
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2014, 06:32:30 PM »
why not just drive around it? Lol
Lots...............
VMVC 251,

Offline Diana Alan

  • REMLR Inc
  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 2238
  • THANKS 108
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2014, 09:49:48 PM »
Bridging equipment may be available, but frequently not where you want it when you want it there.  This system could be carried in one vehicle and erected in a much shorter timeframe than a bailey or girder bridge,

As for steering, like in a train the cables and the groove in the wheel adaptors would make it very difficult to steer out of.  The biggest problems would be the security of the four ground anchors, making sure its level and use in high wind areas may induce swinging.  Remember they use cable ways for ski lifts and the cable almost never comes out of the wheels and a similar system is often used in crane systems, particularly when working over valleys and dam building (although the CoG is usually below the cable.)

Wasn't this a design project from Chertsey or somewhere?
« Last Edit: December 04, 2014, 09:56:00 PM by Diana Alan »
REMLR 240.
Perentie FFR 50-422, SIII FFR 30-146, SIIA GunBuggy 112-726, Mk3 Inter 170-437, ex-SADF SIIB/SIII Radio Relay,
Army Trailers: No5 x 2, W/S x 2, PT1-1.2, Horndraulic ATR dog trailer.
Civilian: MY85 RRc HiLine 4.6, MY51 ex-RACQ 80", MY91 Defender/Reynolds Boughton 6x6, MY12 D4 SDV6

Offline stephendavis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 521
  • THANKS 44
  • Location: act
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2014, 10:47:51 PM »
if you look at an inter and see the centre of the rim there is a ring that is used to step on to get into the cab.
I have seen a photo of the same thing with the inter.

Offline Richard Farrant

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • THANKS 36
  • Location: Kent, England
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2014, 06:04:27 AM »
Wasn't this a design project from Chertsey or somewhere?

It was developed by an Australian officer by name of Miller.

Check this out;
http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/showthread.php?t=13903&highlight=bridge   ;)

cheers Richard
KVE President & Editor
AMVCS newsletter editor
1943 Bedford QLD
1943 Daimler Scout Car

Offline Carzee

  • REMLR Committee
  • Veteran
  • ***
  • Posts: 3275
  • THANKS 147
  • Perentie FFR 50-257
    • Perentie Wiki
  • Location: Canberra
  • REMLR No: 007
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2014, 08:36:23 AM »
When on the inclined section of the cable how does it grip? I assume its not much more than a sort of steel pulley on steel cable. It is a lot less weight than modern Landies but still.. I have tried a cable/flying fox thingy (a couple of years back on <i>The Sygna</i> and the up hill bit was mostly slippage - and that cable was rusty.

Offline Philthy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 534
  • THANKS 71
  • Location: Brisbane
  • REMLR No: 425
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2015, 10:13:14 AM »
« Last Edit: February 26, 2015, 10:18:12 AM by Philthy »

Offline DennisM

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 984
  • THANKS 248
  • Location: Hunter Valley
  • REMLR No: 70
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2015, 04:08:07 PM »
And the lads who do the Bundaberg Military show also set the same thing up, it is on utube somewhere, I donated half a set of the items that bolt onto the L/rover wheels to the museum @ Bandiana some years ago, cheers Dennis :)

Offline THE BOOGER

  • Administrator
  • Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 1468
  • THANKS 144
  • Location: wetherill park, sydney
  • REMLR No: 282
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2015, 04:43:06 PM »
Was common in New Guinea during the war up hill is good the cable attached to the bumper is winch cable. :)
geoff c

Offline juddy

  • REMLR Inc
  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 2515
  • THANKS 62
    • www.landybitz.com.au
  • Location: Queensland
  • REMLR No: 352
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2015, 09:48:24 PM »
They look like British Troops in the Jeep?
1991 110 Truck Surveillance (RFSV), Winch MC2 *51-656*
2004 Truck, Carryall, Lightweight, Modified Military Special, With Winch, MC2/3 205-301, Haulmark PT1-1.2 *205090* No5 Trailer

Images © 2008-2017 J Burton

Offline THE BOOGER

  • Administrator
  • Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 1468
  • THANKS 144
  • Location: wetherill park, sydney
  • REMLR No: 282
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2015, 09:51:22 PM »
Hard to say we had the same tin hat back then :)
geoff c

Offline Richard Farrant

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • THANKS 36
  • Location: Kent, England
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #12 on: April 29, 2015, 09:02:53 AM »
They look like British Troops in the Jeep?

Just seen this ...... they are American troops.

Richard
KVE President & Editor
AMVCS newsletter editor
1943 Bedford QLD
1943 Daimler Scout Car

Offline glbest

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 230
  • THANKS 16
  • Location: bne
Re: I assume this didnít become common practice because it ended badly.
« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2015, 02:59:06 PM »
my father told me about the oic in charge of the 1 RAR LAD in malaya developed techniques using landrover wheels to bridge watercourse.