Author Topic: Diana's Buggy, 112-723/726 - Emmett  (Read 5325 times)

Tommy

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Re: Diana's Buggy
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2013, 02:01:44 AM »
The way the pairs of holes are arranged, it looks like they are to strap the cam netting roll when the vehicle is on the move.

Sort of like these two:


Diana

From the looks of it, it is not for a camo net but a hessian skirt. Hessian was used by the SASR and other army units as a means of covering the wheels whilst parked up. The two close holes would have been to rivet a length of webbing strap with buckle to the body.

The B&W photo below shows how the SASR attached the same webbing strap to their LRPV tailgates. Same size and hole spacing as on your Gunbuggy Diana.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2013, 04:30:59 PM by Tommy »

Offline Diana Alan

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Re: Diana's Buggy
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2013, 10:28:47 AM »
Hmmmm I had often thought it may be straps, but was trying to find a fitting/s that would fit the holes.  Had never considered riveting the straps directly. It would explain why the holes are randomly spaced.

Have you ever seen the straps riveted in two places?

Would this arrangement give a clue to a unit it may have been posted to?
« Last Edit: December 21, 2013, 08:40:34 PM by Diana Alan »
REMLR 240.
Perentie FFR 50-422, SIII FFR 30-146, SIIA GunBuggy 112-726, Mk3 Inter 170-437, ex-SADF SIIB/SIII Radio Relay,
Army Trailers: No5 x 2, W/S x 2, PT1-1.2, Horndraulic ATR dog trailer.
Civilian: MY85 RRc HiLine 4.6, MY51 ex-RACQ 80", MY91 Defender/Reynolds Boughton 6x6, MY12 D4 SDV6

Offline digger

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Re: Diana's Buggy
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2013, 05:22:45 PM »
great stuff guys... loving this thread and the info coming from it...

Tommy, do you have a photo with "skirts down?" 

Diana, maybe talk to RichardO he had SA4 and could maybe tell you the size/space of holes on it... If not he may have photos that can help...
          and to double check he also had SA3 so maybe on that also??  (maybe yours was SA1 or SA2 indicating of course it should go to someone in SA,...MMMMM
          who lives in SA and would love a gunbuggy? )    ::)

 
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Tommy

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Re: Diana's Buggy
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2013, 07:01:33 PM »
great stuff guys... loving this thread and the info coming from it...

Tommy, do you have a photo with "skirts down?" 

Diana, maybe talk to RichardO he had SA4 and could maybe tell you the size/space of holes on it... If not he may have photos that can help...
          and to double check he also had SA3 so maybe on that also??  (maybe yours was SA1 or SA2 indicating of course it should go to someone in SA,...MMMMM
          who lives in SA and would love a gunbuggy? )    ::)

G'day Digger

Both Gunbuggies owned by Richard do not have the same double holes. None. His SA4 buggy is not the same as in the B&W photo. Although in the same location, the 'SA4' painted on Richards buggy is about half the size.

Here is a photo of a LRPV with hessian skirt. Even the Unimog sported a skirt.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2013, 07:13:28 PM by Tommy »

Offline Diana Alan

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Re: Diana's Buggy
« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2013, 08:44:46 PM »
Hi Digger

If we go back to Zulu Delta's markings thread we find that SA1 through SA4 (later SW1 thru 4) were the buggy compliment for a regiment.  So there would be multiples of each code depending upon the number of regiments etc.

Diana
REMLR 240.
Perentie FFR 50-422, SIII FFR 30-146, SIIA GunBuggy 112-726, Mk3 Inter 170-437, ex-SADF SIIB/SIII Radio Relay,
Army Trailers: No5 x 2, W/S x 2, PT1-1.2, Horndraulic ATR dog trailer.
Civilian: MY85 RRc HiLine 4.6, MY51 ex-RACQ 80", MY91 Defender/Reynolds Boughton 6x6, MY12 D4 SDV6

Offline Chazza

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Re: Diana's Buggy
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2013, 09:47:02 AM »
The way the pairs of holes are arranged, it looks like they are to strap the cam netting roll when the vehicle is on the move.

Sort of like these two:


Diana

From the looks of it, it is not for a camo net but a hessian skirt. Hessian was used by the SASR and other army units as a means of covering the wheels whilst parked up.

We used to use hessian on the Internationals and the Rovers by running a length of tie-wire around the vehicle and attaching the hessian to it. Sand bags were used to cover mirrors and lights.

If you look at Diana's Gunbuggy photo - and ignore that it is a gunbuggy - and then ask yourself to look at shapes  and shade; the most obvious parts of the GB then become the black areas under the car. This is the purpose of the hessian then - to remove the shade from the object, which a cam-net cannot do. The hessian can of course be painted to make it blend in with the background.

It is surprising how obvious shade is when viewed from a distance - the black polygon under the GB's front wheel would be a dead giveaway,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64

Offline Diana Alan

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Re: Diana's Buggy, 112-723/726 - Emmett
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2014, 02:21:44 PM »
Charlie and Tommy

We have images of the hessian rolled up and I can see how it would work with tie wire, however we so far have no images of the hessian deployed.

If only the webbing straps are used, how does it support the top of the hessian?  Is there button holes or similar in the top of the hessian?

Are the two ends joined together under the door opening? 

What happens to the front and rear?

Was it ever fitted in SVN and/or outside Oz?

Diana
REMLR 240.
Perentie FFR 50-422, SIII FFR 30-146, SIIA GunBuggy 112-726, Mk3 Inter 170-437, ex-SADF SIIB/SIII Radio Relay,
Army Trailers: No5 x 2, W/S x 2, PT1-1.2, Horndraulic ATR dog trailer.
Civilian: MY85 RRc HiLine 4.6, MY51 ex-RACQ 80", MY91 Defender/Reynolds Boughton 6x6, MY12 D4 SDV6

Online THE BOOGER

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Re: Diana's Buggy, 112-723/726 - Emmett
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2014, 02:47:32 PM »
We tried hessian for a short while on the m113 but found in the bush it got ripped off to easily so the trial lasted less than a month cant remember how we attached it :(
geoff c

Offline Chazza

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Re: Diana's Buggy, 112-723/726 - Emmett
« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2014, 04:04:09 PM »
Charlie and Tommy

We have images of the hessian rolled up and I can see how it would work with tie wire, however we so far have no images of the hessian deployed.

If only the webbing straps are used, how does it support the top of the hessian?  Is there button holes or similar in the top of the hessian?

Are the two ends joined together under the door opening? 

What happens to the front and rear?

Was it ever fitted in SVN and/or outside Oz?

Diana

From what I remember, we tied the hessian to the wire with comms cord, probably about every 300mm and used the same cord to tie it in place when it was rolled up. On the Inters, the roll of hessian would have sat below the doors, so it wouldn't have hampered movement in and out of the truck. On the Rovers I can't remember, but it was probably a separate piece tied to the door. On the GB in the picture the webbing straps would probably hold the hessian up quite well, although a cord or wire could be used with it.

Multiple pieces of hessian can be fitted to any vehicle; for example front; side; door, back, etc. remember all it does is hide the shade under the car and the hessian needs to be quick and easy for two people to roll up and depart quickly, or to deploy quickly. Ends just need to overlap and they can be held down in a wind with a half-full sandbag.

There is no right or wrong way to do the job as long as it is easy to use and hides the shade and remember that the hessian should be painted to help camouflage it,

Cheers Charlie
S2 Command Recce '59
S2A 109" GS '63
S2A Fire Truck '64