The Registry Of Ex-Military Land-Rovers Au, NZ, etc Land-Rover Series 2 ¾ Ton Fitted For Wireless

 

The Series 2 Fitted For Wireless is essentially the same as the Series 2a Fitted For Transmission apart from a few small details. The vehicles were not originally fitted with cut guards or a Brush bar however these items were retrofitted to most vehicles as time went on. It also appears to have suffered the same confusion in collectors circles as the 2a FFT. later on as radio became a more common word for wireless communication devices the fehicles were called Fitted For Radio's (FFR). However to avoid confusion we will call them fitted for Wireless (FFW) on this page..

Radios and equipment appears to have been the same as the series 2a FFT being the Larkspur radios. More information can be found at this link.

Australian Army Radio Gear for B Class Vehicles

 

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Factory archived photos of Series 2 Australian Army Land-Rovers

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This photograph from an army document is one of the few photographs we have of the radio fit out in these vehicles. Thankyou to John Bamford for sending this in to us.

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Copyright Howard Small

Howard took these 2 photographs in 1961 of what he described as a Land Rover Tentacle. The equipment fitted is: HF - C11/R210, VHF - SCR522 .

The C11/R210 is on the left and the SCR522 on the right. The C11/R210 was a new addition as just prior to these photos we had been using WS62 with an RF Amplifier

At that stage the army did not have any means to communicate with aircraft so the SCR522, a WW2 aircraft transceiver which was still in use with the RAAF, was pressed into service in our unit. As you can see the fitting of the antenna for VHF is pretty much a home brew arrangement!

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Copyright Howard Small

The SCR522 required tuning for each mission as it had four (eight?) channels that were preset. The set was not really suited for use in the land rover as it did not have dust protection, etc. It was mounted on some shock mounts to the table.

Prior to the land rovers being brought into service we had Austin Champs and Humbers.

The HF link also provided a phone patch. On one occasion when we were at Singleton (as I recall) we called the base at Mosman and I was patched through to my parents home (I was only 18 at the time) to tell them I would be late home.

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This image was purchased by REMLR from e-bay in 2010. It appears to be an original page from a manual of some sort. The photo has een touched up with ink and dye so as to photocopy more clearly. It appears to be the same vehicle as in the above photo. WARNING, the linked photo is about 2mb, and as such is very large. it is provided at full size so that the detail in the photo can be appreciated.

 

Continued from the left:

Of interest in this photo is the early type towing hook, painted body cappings, radio installations with both guard and body antenna mounts. Original dunlop tyres and herry can holders.

The exhaust appears to head towards the rear rather than the front, but no outlet can be seen.

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This image also appears to be from a manual of some sort, and shows the same configuration on a seperate vehicle.

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Copyright Rover Australia. New at the factory with no fittings

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Copyright Rover Australia. New at the factory with no fittings

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Copyright Rover Australia. New at the factory with no fittings

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This photo shows the side locker fitted to some FFW vehicles, as it was to some 2A FFT vehicles. No brush bar is fitted either.

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This photo was taken in service in vietnam. Stil rounded guards and in this case, no doors.

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Again in vietnam, No doors was the norm in operations within Vietnam so that the crew could easily exit the vehicle in case of an ambush.

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A convoy of vehicles, again, in Vietnam.

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A 104 Sigs FFW bogged in Vietnam.

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Another 104 sigs vehicle early in the Vietnam War. No brush bar in this photo, and the damage to the front shows why they were needed.

 
Land-Rover Series 2 Fitted For Wireless
"In late 1958 the AMF commenced taking delivery of the new Series 2 Land-Rover after trials to find a replacement for the Austin Champ which had been in service since 1950. These Series 2 vehicles in SWB and LWB (1959 models) were supplied with minimal modifications after assembly at Sydney's Pressed Metal Corp (CKD and RHD kits from England)... "

"Their appearance is almost the same as civilian models. They are fitted with towing eyes at the front, tail light protectors and trailer connection at the right side rear, thru the body panel above the location for the rear number plate, some extra instrumentation and switching, and a fire extinguisher. On the dash they have a large blackout switch immediately to the right of the speedo panel. Some photos show an air pressure number 23 in half-inch white paint over the centre of the axles, and a black five inch square painted on the rear panel, on the left side, south east of the tail lights, marked LOAD ¼ TON in white paint. The BWC plate is lower down the front left guard than the Series 2A." ref Stephen Stansfield. Tac holders were fitted front and rear after a change to Formation Markings Standing Orders when the units were in service. Also note that these Series 2 units had a pintle hook, the early type, as fitted to the Austin Champs.

 

 

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